Facts every web dev should know before they burn out and turn to painting

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

Our great sponsors
  • Sonar - Write Clean Python Code. Always.
  • InfluxDB - Build time-series-based applications quickly and at scale.
  • SaaSHub - Software Alternatives and Reviews
  • ECMAScript 6 compatibility table

    ECMAScript 5/6/7 compatibility tables

  • browserslist

    🦔 Share target browsers between different front-end tools, like Autoprefixer, Stylelint and babel-preset-env

    Browserlist [1] makes use of the browser market shares and you can use it with plugins such as eslint-plugin-compat [2].

    [1] https://github.com/browserslist/browserslist

  • Sonar

    Write Clean Python Code. Always.. Sonar helps you commit clean code every time. With over 225 unique rules to find Python bugs, code smells & vulnerabilities, Sonar finds the issues while you focus on the work.

  • eslint-plugin-compat

    Check the browser compatibility of your code

  • xournalpp

    Xournal++ is a handwriting notetaking software with PDF annotation support. Written in C++ with GTK3, supporting Linux (e.g. Ubuntu, Debian, Arch, SUSE), macOS and Windows 10. Supports pen input from devices such as Wacom Tablets.

    I also learned about the concept of pressure curves, and that they're really annoying both to implement and to get right: https://github.com/xournalpp/xournalpp/issues/2619, https://github.com/xournalpp/xournalpp/pull/2622, https://github.com/xournalpp/xournalpp/issues/1170

    The two one-liners above to convert pressure to lineWidth are the result of playing around with no idea what I'm doing for a few minutes. They... work, in the sense that I can tolerate them for about 30 seconds :) I keep playing with them because they don't "click". I wouldn't mind suggestions for how to actually do this (my google-fu isn't finding anything, likely because I don't know what to look for). I had a poke around Krita, but only found C++ abstractions.

    I also stumbled on http://willowsystems.github.io/jSignature/#/about/linesmooth..., which is an awesome looking bit of open source code. It implements both realtime curve extrapolation and pressure approximation for devices/environments that don't report that.

  • glasgow

    Scots Army Knife for electronics

    Hmm. A followup question: are there any cheats/hacks that would make it possible (if painful) to for example explore the world of USB3, PCIe, or Linux on low-end-ish ARM (eg https://www.thirtythreeforty.net/posts/2019/12/my-business-c..., based on the 533MHz https://linux-sunxi.org/F1C100s), without needing to buy equipment in the mid-4-figure/low-5-figure range, if I were able to substitute a statistically larger-than-average amount of free time (and discipline)?

    For example, I learned about https://github.com/GlasgowEmbedded/glasgow recently, a bit of a niche kitchen sink that uses https://github.com/nmigen/nmigen/ to lower a domain-specific subset of Python 3 (https://nmigen.info/nmigen/latest/lang.html) into Verilog which then runs on the Glasgow board's iCE40HX8K. The project basically makes it easier to use cheap FPGAs for rapid iteration. (The README makes a point that the synthesis is sufficiently fast that caching isn't needed.)

    In certain extremely specific situations where circumstances align perfectly (caveat emptor), devices like this can sometimes present a temporary escape to the inevitable process of acquiring one's first second-hand high-end oscilloscope (fingers-crossed the expensive bits still have a few years left in them). To some extent they may also commoditize the exploration of very high-speed interfaces, which are rapidly becoming a commonplace principal of computers (eg, having 10Gbps everywhere when USB3.1 hits market saturation will be interesting) faster than test and analysis kit can keep up (eg to do proper hardware security analysis work). The Glasgow is perhaps not quite an answer to that entire statement, but maybe represents beginning steps in that sort of direction.

    So, to reiterate - it's probably an unhelpfully broad question, and I'm still learning about the field so haven't quite got the preciseness I want yet, but I'm curious what gadgetry, techniques, etc would perhaps allow someone to "hack it" and dive into this stuff on a shoestring budget? :)

  • businesscard-linux

    A Buildroot distribution small enough to run on my business card

    Hmm. A followup question: are there any cheats/hacks that would make it possible (if painful) to for example explore the world of USB3, PCIe, or Linux on low-end-ish ARM (eg https://www.thirtythreeforty.net/posts/2019/12/my-business-c..., based on the 533MHz https://linux-sunxi.org/F1C100s), without needing to buy equipment in the mid-4-figure/low-5-figure range, if I were able to substitute a statistically larger-than-average amount of free time (and discipline)?

    For example, I learned about https://github.com/GlasgowEmbedded/glasgow recently, a bit of a niche kitchen sink that uses https://github.com/nmigen/nmigen/ to lower a domain-specific subset of Python 3 (https://nmigen.info/nmigen/latest/lang.html) into Verilog which then runs on the Glasgow board's iCE40HX8K. The project basically makes it easier to use cheap FPGAs for rapid iteration. (The README makes a point that the synthesis is sufficiently fast that caching isn't needed.)

    In certain extremely specific situations where circumstances align perfectly (caveat emptor), devices like this can sometimes present a temporary escape to the inevitable process of acquiring one's first second-hand high-end oscilloscope (fingers-crossed the expensive bits still have a few years left in them). To some extent they may also commoditize the exploration of very high-speed interfaces, which are rapidly becoming a commonplace principal of computers (eg, having 10Gbps everywhere when USB3.1 hits market saturation will be interesting) faster than test and analysis kit can keep up (eg to do proper hardware security analysis work). The Glasgow is perhaps not quite an answer to that entire statement, but maybe represents beginning steps in that sort of direction.

    So, to reiterate - it's probably an unhelpfully broad question, and I'm still learning about the field so haven't quite got the preciseness I want yet, but I'm curious what gadgetry, techniques, etc would perhaps allow someone to "hack it" and dive into this stuff on a shoestring budget? :)

  • amaranth

    A modern hardware definition language and toolchain based on Python

    Hmm. A followup question: are there any cheats/hacks that would make it possible (if painful) to for example explore the world of USB3, PCIe, or Linux on low-end-ish ARM (eg https://www.thirtythreeforty.net/posts/2019/12/my-business-c..., based on the 533MHz https://linux-sunxi.org/F1C100s), without needing to buy equipment in the mid-4-figure/low-5-figure range, if I were able to substitute a statistically larger-than-average amount of free time (and discipline)?

    For example, I learned about https://github.com/GlasgowEmbedded/glasgow recently, a bit of a niche kitchen sink that uses https://github.com/nmigen/nmigen/ to lower a domain-specific subset of Python 3 (https://nmigen.info/nmigen/latest/lang.html) into Verilog which then runs on the Glasgow board's iCE40HX8K. The project basically makes it easier to use cheap FPGAs for rapid iteration. (The README makes a point that the synthesis is sufficiently fast that caching isn't needed.)

    In certain extremely specific situations where circumstances align perfectly (caveat emptor), devices like this can sometimes present a temporary escape to the inevitable process of acquiring one's first second-hand high-end oscilloscope (fingers-crossed the expensive bits still have a few years left in them). To some extent they may also commoditize the exploration of very high-speed interfaces, which are rapidly becoming a commonplace principal of computers (eg, having 10Gbps everywhere when USB3.1 hits market saturation will be interesting) faster than test and analysis kit can keep up (eg to do proper hardware security analysis work). The Glasgow is perhaps not quite an answer to that entire statement, but maybe represents beginning steps in that sort of direction.

    So, to reiterate - it's probably an unhelpfully broad question, and I'm still learning about the field so haven't quite got the preciseness I want yet, but I'm curious what gadgetry, techniques, etc would perhaps allow someone to "hack it" and dive into this stuff on a shoestring budget? :)

  • InfluxDB

    Build time-series-based applications quickly and at scale.. InfluxDB is the Time Series Platform where developers build real-time applications for analytics, IoT and cloud-native services. Easy to start, it is available in the cloud or on-premises.

  • deno

    A modern runtime for JavaScript and TypeScript.

    I would say, using it with Typescript became much more common.

    There is also deno (https://deno.land/), from the same creator.

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

Suggest a related project

Related posts