au VS robin-hood-hashing

Compare au vs robin-hood-hashing and see what are their differences.

au

A C++14-compatible physical units library with no dependencies and a single-file delivery option. Emphasis on safety, accessibility, performance, and developer experience. (by aurora-opensource)

robin-hood-hashing

Fast & memory efficient hashtable based on robin hood hashing for C++11/14/17/20 (by martinus)
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au robin-hood-hashing
2 23
309 1,465
2.6% -
7.9 0.0
7 days ago about 1 year ago
C++ C++
Apache License 2.0 MIT License
The number of mentions indicates the total number of mentions that we've tracked plus the number of user suggested alternatives.
Stars - the number of stars that a project has on GitHub. Growth - month over month growth in stars.
Activity is a relative number indicating how actively a project is being developed. Recent commits have higher weight than older ones.
For example, an activity of 9.0 indicates that a project is amongst the top 10% of the most actively developed projects that we are tracking.

au

Posts with mentions or reviews of au. We have used some of these posts to build our list of alternatives and similar projects. The last one was on 2023-04-21.

robin-hood-hashing

Posts with mentions or reviews of robin-hood-hashing. We have used some of these posts to build our list of alternatives and similar projects. The last one was on 2023-11-10.
  • Factor is faster than Zig
    11 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 10 Nov 2023
    In my example the table stores the hash codes themselves instead of the keys (because the hash function is invertible)

    Oh, I see, right. If determining the home bucket is trivial, then the back-shifting method is great. The issue is just that it’s not as much of a general-purpose solution as it may initially seem.

    “With a different algorithm (Robin Hood or bidirectional linear probing), the load factor can be kept well over 90% with good performance, as the benchmarks in the same repo demonstrate.”

    I’ve seen the 90% claim made several times in literature on Robin Hood hash tables. In my experience, the claim is a bit exaggerated, although I suppose it depends on what our idea of “good performance” is. See these benchmarks, which again go up to a maximum load factor of 0.95 (Although boost and Absl forcibly grow/rehash at 0.85-0.9):

    https://strong-starlight-4ea0ed.netlify.app/

    Tsl, Martinus, and CC are all Robin Hood tables (https://github.com/Tessil/robin-map, https://github.com/martinus/robin-hood-hashing, and https://github.com/JacksonAllan/CC, respectively). Absl and Boost are the well-known SIMD-based hash tables. Khash (https://github.com/attractivechaos/klib/blob/master/khash.h) is, I think, an ordinary open-addressing table using quadratic probing. Fastmap is a new, yet-to-be-published design that is fundamentally similar to bytell (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2fKMP47slQ) but also incorporates some aspects of the aforementioned SIMD maps (it caches a 4-bit fragment of the hash code to avoid most key comparisons).

    As you can see, all the Robin Hood maps spike upwards dramatically as the load factor gets high, becoming as much as 5-6 times slower at 0.95 vs 0.5 in one of the benchmarks (uint64_t key, 256-bit struct value: Total time to erase 1000 existing elements with N elements in map). Only the SIMD maps (with Boost being the better performer) and Fastmap appear mostly immune to load factor in all benchmarks, although the SIMD maps do - I believe - use tombstones for deletion.

    I’ve only read briefly about bi-directional linear probing – never experimented with it.

  • If this isn't the perfect data structure, why?
    3 projects | /r/C_Programming | 22 Oct 2023
    From your other comments, it seems like your knowledge of hash tables might be limited to closed-addressing/separate-chaining hash tables. The current frontrunners in high-performance, memory-efficient hash table design all use some form of open addressing, largely to avoid pointer chasing and limit cache misses. In this regard, you want to check our SSE-powered hash tables (such as Abseil, Boost, and Folly/F14), Robin Hood hash tables (such as Martinus and Tessil), or Skarupke (I've recently had a lot of success with a similar design that I will publish here soon and is destined to replace my own Robin Hood hash tables). Also check out existing research/benchmarks here and here. But we a little bit wary of any benchmarks you look at or perform because there are a lot of factors that influence the result (e.g. benchmarking hash tables at a maximum load factor of 0.5 will produce wildly different result to benchmarking them at a load factor of 0.95, just as benchmarking them with integer keys-value pairs will produce different results to benchmarking them with 256-byte key-value pairs). And you need to familiarize yourself with open addressing and different probing strategies (e.g. linear, quadratic) first.
  • boost::unordered standalone
    3 projects | /r/cpp | 9 Jul 2023
    Also, FYI there is robin_hood::unordered_{map,set} which has very high performance, and is header-only and standalone.
  • Solving “Two Sum” in C with a tiny hash table
    1 project | news.ycombinator.com | 29 Jun 2023
    std::unordered_map is notoriously slow, several times slower than a "proper" hashmap implementation like Google's absl or Martin's robin-hood-hashing [1]. That said, std::sort is not the fastest sort implementation, either. It is hard to say which will win.

    [1]: https://github.com/martinus/robin-hood-hashing

  • Convenient Containers v1.0.3: Better compile speed, faster maps and sets
    4 projects | /r/C_Programming | 3 May 2023
    The main advantage of the latest version is that it reduces build time by about 53% (GCC 12.1), based on the comprehensive test suit found in unit_tests.c. This improvement is significant because compile time was previously a drawback of this library, with maps and sets—in particular—compiling slower than their C++ template-based counterparts. I achieved it by refactoring the library to do less work inside API macros and, in particular, use fewer _Generic statements, which seem to be a compile-speed bottleneck. A nice side effect of the refactor is that the library can now more easily be extended with the planned dynamic strings and ordered maps and sets. The other major improvement concerns the performance of maps and sets. Here are some interactive benchmarks[1] comparing CC’s maps to two popular implementations of Robin Hood hash maps in C++ (as well as std::unordered_map as a baseline). They show that CC maps perform roughly on par with those implementations.
  • Effortless Performance Improvements in C++: std:unordered_map
    4 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 2 Mar 2023
    For anyone in a situation where a set/map (or unordered versions) is in a hot part of the code, I'd also highly recommend Robin Hood: https://github.com/martinus/robin-hood-hashing

    It made a huge difference in one of the programs I was running.

  • Inside boost::unordered_flat_map
    11 projects | /r/cpp | 18 Nov 2022
  • What are some cool modern libraries you enjoy using?
    32 projects | /r/cpp | 18 Sep 2022
    Oh my bad. Still thought -- your name.. it looks very familiar to me. Are you the robin_hood hashing guy perhaps? Yes you are! My bad -- https://github.com/martinus/robin-hood-hashing.
  • Performance comparison: counting words in Python, C/C++, Awk, Rust, and more
    12 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 24 Jul 2022
    Got a bit better C++ version here which uses a couple libraries instead of std:: stuff - https://gist.github.com/jcelerier/74dfd473bccec8f1bd5d78be5a... ; boost, fmt and https://github.com/martinus/robin-hood-hashing

        $ g++ -I robin-hood-hashing/src/include -O2 -flto -std=c++20 -fno-exceptions -fno-unwind-tables -fno-asynchronous-unwind-tables -lfmt
  • A fast & densely stored hashmap and hashset based on robin-hood backward shift deletion
    5 projects | /r/cpp | 4 Jul 2022
    The implementation is mostly inspired by this comment and lessons learned from my older robin-hood-hashing hashmap.

What are some alternatives?

When comparing au and robin-hood-hashing you can also consider the following projects:

astar_pathfinder_grid_2d - Single header library for path finding on 2D grids with A* algorithm. Includes a stable and a fast path finders.

parallel-hashmap - A family of header-only, very fast and memory-friendly hashmap and btree containers.

small_vector - A fully featured single header library implementing a vector container with a small buffer optimization.

STL - MSVC's implementation of the C++ Standard Library.

units - A library to represent units with dimensions

robin-map - C++ implementation of a fast hash map and hash set using robin hood hashing

mp-units - The quantities and units library for C++

xxHash - Extremely fast non-cryptographic hash algorithm

unlib - a light-weight, header-only, dependency-free, C++14 library for ISO units

{fmt} - A modern formatting library

UNITS - a compile-time, header-only, dimensional analysis and unit conversion library built on c++14 with no dependencies.

tracy - Frame profiler

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