The Pdfalyzer is a tool for visualizing the inner tree structure of a PDF in large and colorful diagrams as well as scanning its internals for suspicious content

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on reddit.com/r/Python

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  • PyPDF2

    A pure-python PDF library capable of splitting, merging, cropping, and transforming the pages of PDF files

    This tool was built to fill a gap in the PDF assessment landscape. Didier Stevens's pdfid.py and pdf-parser.py are still the best game in town when it comes to PDF analysis tools but they lack in the visualization department and also don't give you much to work with as far as giving you a data model you can write your own code around. Peepdf seemed promising but turned out to be in a buggy, out of date, and more or less unfixable state. And neither of them offered much in the way of tooling for embedded binary analysis. Thus I felt the world might be slightly improved if I strung together a couple of more stable/well known/actively maintained open source projects (AnyTree, PyPDF2, and Rich) into this tool.

  • pdfalyzer

    Analyze PDFs. With colors. And Yara.

    The Pdfalyzer is a command line tool (paralyze) as well as a library for working with, visualizing, and scanning the contents of a PDF. Motivation for the project was personal: I got hacked by a PDF that turned out to be hiding its maleficent instructions inside the font binary where it was missed by modern malware scanners (twitter thread) (more details)

  • InfluxDB

    Build time-series-based applications quickly and at scale.. InfluxDB is the Time Series Platform where developers build real-time applications for analytics, IoT and cloud-native services. Easy to start, it is available in the cloud or on-premises.

  • DidierStevensSuite

    Please no pull requests for this repository. Thanks!

    This tool was built to fill a gap in the PDF assessment landscape. Didier Stevens's pdfid.py and pdf-parser.py are still the best game in town when it comes to PDF analysis tools but they lack in the visualization department and also don't give you much to work with as far as giving you a data model you can write your own code around. Peepdf seemed promising but turned out to be in a buggy, out of date, and more or less unfixable state. And neither of them offered much in the way of tooling for embedded binary analysis. Thus I felt the world might be slightly improved if I strung together a couple of more stable/well known/actively maintained open source projects (AnyTree, PyPDF2, and Rich) into this tool.

  • peepdf

    Powerful Python tool to analyze PDF documents

    This tool was built to fill a gap in the PDF assessment landscape. Didier Stevens's pdfid.py and pdf-parser.py are still the best game in town when it comes to PDF analysis tools but they lack in the visualization department and also don't give you much to work with as far as giving you a data model you can write your own code around. Peepdf seemed promising but turned out to be in a buggy, out of date, and more or less unfixable state. And neither of them offered much in the way of tooling for embedded binary analysis. Thus I felt the world might be slightly improved if I strung together a couple of more stable/well known/actively maintained open source projects (AnyTree, PyPDF2, and Rich) into this tool.

  • anytree

    Python tree data library

    This tool was built to fill a gap in the PDF assessment landscape. Didier Stevens's pdfid.py and pdf-parser.py are still the best game in town when it comes to PDF analysis tools but they lack in the visualization department and also don't give you much to work with as far as giving you a data model you can write your own code around. Peepdf seemed promising but turned out to be in a buggy, out of date, and more or less unfixable state. And neither of them offered much in the way of tooling for embedded binary analysis. Thus I felt the world might be slightly improved if I strung together a couple of more stable/well known/actively maintained open source projects (AnyTree, PyPDF2, and Rich) into this tool.

  • rich

    Rich is a Python library for rich text and beautiful formatting in the terminal.

    This tool was built to fill a gap in the PDF assessment landscape. Didier Stevens's pdfid.py and pdf-parser.py are still the best game in town when it comes to PDF analysis tools but they lack in the visualization department and also don't give you much to work with as far as giving you a data model you can write your own code around. Peepdf seemed promising but turned out to be in a buggy, out of date, and more or less unfixable state. And neither of them offered much in the way of tooling for embedded binary analysis. Thus I felt the world might be slightly improved if I strung together a couple of more stable/well known/actively maintained open source projects (AnyTree, PyPDF2, and Rich) into this tool.

  • yaralyzer

    Visually inspect and force decode YARA and regex matches found in both binary and text data. With Colors.

    for the ultra low level the Didier Stevens tools mentioned in the OP are rock solid, but for anything sort of in the middle zone - allowing you to work with the logical structure, having a consistent API, etc. etc. - yeah there's not much out there, which is why I ended up making The Pdfalyzer (and The Yaralyzer, which was basically just a side effect).

  • Sonar

    Write Clean Python Code. Always.. Sonar helps you commit clean code every time. With over 225 unique rules to find Python bugs, code smells & vulnerabilities, Sonar finds the issues while you focus on the work.

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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