TUI in webapp design language(CSS) and pattern(check the demo, it’s next level)

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

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  • rich-cli

    Rich-cli is a command line toolbox for fancy output in the terminal

  • Scout Monitoring

    Free Django app performance insights with Scout Monitoring. Get Scout setup in minutes, and let us sweat the small stuff. A couple lines in settings.py is all you need to start monitoring your apps. Sign up for our free tier today.

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  • termdbms

    A TUI for viewing and editing database files.

  • Mosh

    Mobile Shell

    If you have a crappy connection, you should really use mosh (https://mosh.org/) instead of SSH.

    My own experience is that text user interfaces over mosh work far better than web applications when on a crappy connection.

    My experience isn't specifically with textualized-based applications though (one is irssi, the terminal IRC client, and some with proprietary applications from $work).

  • uggly

    framework for TUI client and server

    I'm actually working on this. Component based over the wire TUI system. It's in a decent alpha state but I want to code and host some more sample sites before I start sharing a ton.

    Protocol: https://github.com/rendicott/uggly

    Client with gif demo: https://github.com/rendicott/uggly-client

  • uggly-client

    client that uses uggly grpc library

    I'm actually working on this. Component based over the wire TUI system. It's in a decent alpha state but I want to code and host some more sample sites before I start sharing a ton.

    Protocol: https://github.com/rendicott/uggly

    Client with gif demo: https://github.com/rendicott/uggly-client

  • textual

    The lean application framework for Python. Build sophisticated user interfaces with a simple Python API. Run your apps in the terminal and a web browser.

    I assumed my mild hyperbole would need no explanation, but perhaps that was optimistic. Conceding the author's claim as he made it and you quote it, I think there's still a discussion to be had here.

    > It's not hard to imagine it being rigorously tested on several platforms with modern CI tools.

    It's not hard to imagine a lot of things! But when I looked at the repository earlier [1], I saw a very thin unit test suite that hasn't been touched in eight months, and very little evidence of CI in use at all. Certainly, if there's anything examining actual behavior in any terminal environment, I saw no sign of it.

    Perhaps you'll be able to point me to what I missed. Assuming I didn't, though - for a UI framework that seems designed to have me build my entire application on top of it, this doesn't really inspire a great deal of confidence - as I mentioned above, the risk is that if it turns out to support many fewer terminals than claimed, I'm forced to choose between at minimum significant and potentially near-total rework, or telling those of my users who have terminal-related trouble that I can't spare the time to support them.

    If this were a pure open source project, I wouldn't raise this issue in this way. (I'd more likely spend some time looking at how I might build the basis of a CI setup like the one I describe - that might be a fun project, assuming I could find the focus time to spend!) But Textualize appears to be a company which is currently hiring, and which I assume intends at some point to sell some product or service. I think that makes it fair to apply a similar standard here to the sort I use when vetting any vendor. What would you have me do instead? Use kid gloves, and implicitly insult the team behind this project with the assumption that they can't fairly be expected to live up to a standard like that?

    I grant they're an early-stage startup, maybe still a one-man band at this point, and likely haven't had time to get to the kind of detailed testing I'm asking about. That's fair, but that also leads one to suggest that the claims being made at this stage are somewhat ahead of what can reasonably be supported. I'd be a little hesitant about that personally, but then again it's not my company, my product, or my project.

    [1] https://github.com/Textualize/textual/tree/main/tests

  • rich

    Rich is a Python library for rich text and beautiful formatting in the terminal.

    We simply have a different perspective on this. You see a TUI and have experience in the "Bronze Age" of the Internet in which browsers were not so stable across platforms/etc. and think that this more or less just doesn't work. I suspect peoples' experiences using it for a while now won't sway you; you are more than welcome to assume everything works only on one computer and is reliably broken elsewhere. I don't care what you choose to build your company with but I personally find this attitude towards new tools toxic and paralyzing. Hence my attempt at engaging to learn more.

    From my perspective, I've used Rich in one of the very few contexts that practically matter (a terminal on macOS) and had a good experience. Will M. has been developing it in the open for a couple of years now and it's nearing critical mass in some parts of the Python ecosystem. If it was a diaper turned into a Molotov cocktail, it simply wouldn't the adoption it has so far. It probably runs fine on the three major operating systems of today, which is pretty much what a TUI needs to do. I have no idea if it runs smoothly on a Commodore 64 and to be honest I don't really care.

    > Perhaps you'll be able to point me to what I missed.

    You could have a look at Rich itself, which is what Textualize uses: https://github.com/Textualize/rich. I don't build UIs but the number of files/LOC gives me a bit more confidence that my personal experience wasn't a fluke.

    > If this were a pure open source project,

    What's a "pure" open source project in your view? You can review the licenses of the projects yourself and determine if MIT is "pure" open source, or see what the company says about their plans with the project: https://www.textualize.io/what-we-do

    > Rich, Textual, and many of our future projects will continue to be built in public, with an Open-source license.

  • InfluxDB

    Power Real-Time Data Analytics at Scale. Get real-time insights from all types of time series data with InfluxDB. Ingest, query, and analyze billions of data points in real-time with unbounded cardinality.

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  • wish

    Make SSH apps, just like that! 💫

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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