Harbormaster: The anti-Kubernetes for your personal server

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

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  • GitHub repo harbormaster

    Ah yep, thanks! One thing that's possible (and I'd like to do) with Harbormaster is add configuration to the upstream apps themselves, so to deploy, say, Plex, all you need to do is add the Plex repo URL to your config (and add a few env vars) and that's it!

    I already added a config for Plex in the Harbormaster repo, but obviously it's better if the upstream app itself has it:

    https://gitlab.com/stavros/harbormaster/-/blob/master/apps/p...

  • GitHub repo docker-box

    A lightweight docker application platform for single servers.

    My anti-kubernetes setup for small single servers is docker swarm, portainer & traefik. It's a setup that works well on low powered machines, gives you TLS (letsencrypt) and traefik takes care of the complicated network routing.

    I created a shell script to easily set this up: https://github.com/badsyntax/docker-box

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  • GitHub repo hcl

    HCL is the HashiCorp configuration language.

    > There is gap in the market between VM oriented simple deployments and kubernetes based setup.

    In my experience, there are actually two platforms that do this pretty well.

    First, there's Docker Swarm ( https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ ) - it comes preinstalled with Docker, can handle either single machine deployments or clusters, even multi-master deployments. Furthermore, it just adds a few values to Docker Compose YAML format ( https://docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/compose-file-v3... ) , so it's incredibly easy to launch containers with it. And there are lovely web interfaces, such as Portainer ( https://www.portainer.io/ ) or Swarmpit ( https://swarmpit.io/ ) for simpler management.

    Secondly, there's also Hashicorp Nomad ( https://www.nomadproject.io/ ) - it's a single executable package, which allows similar setups to Docker Swarm, integrates nicely with service meshes like Consul ( https://www.consul.io/ ), and also allows non-containerized deployments to be managed, such as Java applications and others ( https://www.nomadproject.io/docs/drivers ). The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    There are also some other tools, like CapRover ( https://caprover.com/ ) available, but many of those use Docker Swarm under the hood and i personally haven't used them. Of course, if you still want Kubernetes but implemented in a slightly simpler way, then there's also the Rancher K3s project ( https://k3s.io/ ) which packages the core of Kubernetes into a smaller executable and uses SQLite by default for storage, if i recall correctly. I've used it briefly and the resource usage was indeed far more reasonable than that of full Kubernetes clusters (like RKE).

  • GitHub repo git-pipe

    Hassle-free minimal CI/CD for git repositories with docker or docker-compose projects.

    Looks nice. I did something similar not so much time ago https://github.com/reddec/git-pipe

  • GitHub repo https-portal

    A fully automated HTTPS server powered by Nginx, Let's Encrypt and Docker.

    This looks awesome!

    What I couldn't immediately see from skimming the repo is:

    How hard would it be to use a docker-based automatic https proxy such as this [1] with all projects?

    I've had a handfull of docker-based services running for many years and love the convenience. What I'm doing now is simply wrap the images in a bash script that stops the containers, snapshots the ZFS volume, pulls newer versions and re-launches everything. That's then run via cron once a day. Zero issues across at least five years.

    [1] https://github.com/SteveLTN/https-portal

  • GitHub repo hbm

    HBM is an application to authorize and manage authorized docker commands using Docker AuthZ plugin

    Beware that harbormaster is also the name of a program for adding RBAC to docker: https://github.com/kassisol/hbm

    It's kind of abandonware because it was the developer's PhD project and he graduated, but it is rather unfortunately widely used in one of the largest GEOINT programs in the US government right now because it was the only thing that offered this capability 5 years ago. Raytheon developers have been begging to fork it for a long time so they can update and make bug fixes, but Raytheon legal won't let them fork a GPL-licensed project.

  • GitHub repo Dokku

    A docker-powered PaaS that helps you build and manage the lifecycle of applications

    A little more aimed towards app deployment:

    - https://dokku.com

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  • GitHub repo Juju

    Universal Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) for Kubernetes operators, and operators for traditional Linux and Windows apps, with declarative integration between operators for automated microservice integration.

    Are you talking about this[1]?

    [1] https://juju.is/

  • GitHub repo shoe-string-server

    A collection of scripts for running a bunch of services in docker on a budget

    Interestingly this seems like a pretty popular problem to solve.

    I made a similar thing recently as well, although with the goal to handle ingress and monitoring out the box as well, whilst still able to run comfortably on a small box.

    I took a fairly similar approach, leveraging docker-compose files, and using a single data directory for ease of backup (although it's on my to-do list to split out conf/data).

    If there was a way to get a truly slim and easy to setup k8s compatible environment I'd probably prefer that, but I couldn't find anything that wouldn't eat most of my small servers ram

    https://github.com/mnahkies/shoe-string-server if you're interested

  • GitHub repo dokku-scheduler-nomad

    Scheduler plugin for deploying applications to nomad

    you should give nomad a try. Dokku has a nomad backend. https://github.com/dokku/dokku-scheduler-nomad.

  • GitHub repo Portainer

    Making Docker and Kubernetes management easy.

    > There is gap in the market between VM oriented simple deployments and kubernetes based setup.

    In my experience, there are actually two platforms that do this pretty well.

    First, there's Docker Swarm ( https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ ) - it comes preinstalled with Docker, can handle either single machine deployments or clusters, even multi-master deployments. Furthermore, it just adds a few values to Docker Compose YAML format ( https://docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/compose-file-v3... ) , so it's incredibly easy to launch containers with it. And there are lovely web interfaces, such as Portainer ( https://www.portainer.io/ ) or Swarmpit ( https://swarmpit.io/ ) for simpler management.

    Secondly, there's also Hashicorp Nomad ( https://www.nomadproject.io/ ) - it's a single executable package, which allows similar setups to Docker Swarm, integrates nicely with service meshes like Consul ( https://www.consul.io/ ), and also allows non-containerized deployments to be managed, such as Java applications and others ( https://www.nomadproject.io/docs/drivers ). The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    There are also some other tools, like CapRover ( https://caprover.com/ ) available, but many of those use Docker Swarm under the hood and i personally haven't used them. Of course, if you still want Kubernetes but implemented in a slightly simpler way, then there's also the Rancher K3s project ( https://k3s.io/ ) which packages the core of Kubernetes into a smaller executable and uses SQLite by default for storage, if i recall correctly. I've used it briefly and the resource usage was indeed far more reasonable than that of full Kubernetes clusters (like RKE).

  • GitHub repo Nomad

    Nomad is an easy-to-use, flexible, and performant workload orchestrator that can deploy a mix of microservice, batch, containerized, and non-containerized applications. Nomad is easy to operate and scale and has native Consul and Vault integrations.

    > There is gap in the market between VM oriented simple deployments and kubernetes based setup.

    In my experience, there are actually two platforms that do this pretty well.

    First, there's Docker Swarm ( https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ ) - it comes preinstalled with Docker, can handle either single machine deployments or clusters, even multi-master deployments. Furthermore, it just adds a few values to Docker Compose YAML format ( https://docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/compose-file-v3... ) , so it's incredibly easy to launch containers with it. And there are lovely web interfaces, such as Portainer ( https://www.portainer.io/ ) or Swarmpit ( https://swarmpit.io/ ) for simpler management.

    Secondly, there's also Hashicorp Nomad ( https://www.nomadproject.io/ ) - it's a single executable package, which allows similar setups to Docker Swarm, integrates nicely with service meshes like Consul ( https://www.consul.io/ ), and also allows non-containerized deployments to be managed, such as Java applications and others ( https://www.nomadproject.io/docs/drivers ). The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    There are also some other tools, like CapRover ( https://caprover.com/ ) available, but many of those use Docker Swarm under the hood and i personally haven't used them. Of course, if you still want Kubernetes but implemented in a slightly simpler way, then there's also the Rancher K3s project ( https://k3s.io/ ) which packages the core of Kubernetes into a smaller executable and uses SQLite by default for storage, if i recall correctly. I've used it briefly and the resource usage was indeed far more reasonable than that of full Kubernetes clusters (like RKE).

  • GitHub repo consul

    Consul is a distributed, highly available, and data center aware solution to connect and configure applications across dynamic, distributed infrastructure.

    > There is gap in the market between VM oriented simple deployments and kubernetes based setup.

    In my experience, there are actually two platforms that do this pretty well.

    First, there's Docker Swarm ( https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ ) - it comes preinstalled with Docker, can handle either single machine deployments or clusters, even multi-master deployments. Furthermore, it just adds a few values to Docker Compose YAML format ( https://docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/compose-file-v3... ) , so it's incredibly easy to launch containers with it. And there are lovely web interfaces, such as Portainer ( https://www.portainer.io/ ) or Swarmpit ( https://swarmpit.io/ ) for simpler management.

    Secondly, there's also Hashicorp Nomad ( https://www.nomadproject.io/ ) - it's a single executable package, which allows similar setups to Docker Swarm, integrates nicely with service meshes like Consul ( https://www.consul.io/ ), and also allows non-containerized deployments to be managed, such as Java applications and others ( https://www.nomadproject.io/docs/drivers ). The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    There are also some other tools, like CapRover ( https://caprover.com/ ) available, but many of those use Docker Swarm under the hood and i personally haven't used them. Of course, if you still want Kubernetes but implemented in a slightly simpler way, then there's also the Rancher K3s project ( https://k3s.io/ ) which packages the core of Kubernetes into a smaller executable and uses SQLite by default for storage, if i recall correctly. I've used it briefly and the resource usage was indeed far more reasonable than that of full Kubernetes clusters (like RKE).

  • GitHub repo swarmpit

    Lightweight mobile-friendly Docker Swarm management UI

    > There is gap in the market between VM oriented simple deployments and kubernetes based setup.

    In my experience, there are actually two platforms that do this pretty well.

    First, there's Docker Swarm ( https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ ) - it comes preinstalled with Docker, can handle either single machine deployments or clusters, even multi-master deployments. Furthermore, it just adds a few values to Docker Compose YAML format ( https://docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/compose-file-v3... ) , so it's incredibly easy to launch containers with it. And there are lovely web interfaces, such as Portainer ( https://www.portainer.io/ ) or Swarmpit ( https://swarmpit.io/ ) for simpler management.

    Secondly, there's also Hashicorp Nomad ( https://www.nomadproject.io/ ) - it's a single executable package, which allows similar setups to Docker Swarm, integrates nicely with service meshes like Consul ( https://www.consul.io/ ), and also allows non-containerized deployments to be managed, such as Java applications and others ( https://www.nomadproject.io/docs/drivers ). The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    There are also some other tools, like CapRover ( https://caprover.com/ ) available, but many of those use Docker Swarm under the hood and i personally haven't used them. Of course, if you still want Kubernetes but implemented in a slightly simpler way, then there's also the Rancher K3s project ( https://k3s.io/ ) which packages the core of Kubernetes into a smaller executable and uses SQLite by default for storage, if i recall correctly. I've used it briefly and the resource usage was indeed far more reasonable than that of full Kubernetes clusters (like RKE).

  • GitHub repo k3s

    Lightweight Kubernetes

    > There is gap in the market between VM oriented simple deployments and kubernetes based setup.

    In my experience, there are actually two platforms that do this pretty well.

    First, there's Docker Swarm ( https://docs.docker.com/engine/swarm/ ) - it comes preinstalled with Docker, can handle either single machine deployments or clusters, even multi-master deployments. Furthermore, it just adds a few values to Docker Compose YAML format ( https://docs.docker.com/compose/compose-file/compose-file-v3... ) , so it's incredibly easy to launch containers with it. And there are lovely web interfaces, such as Portainer ( https://www.portainer.io/ ) or Swarmpit ( https://swarmpit.io/ ) for simpler management.

    Secondly, there's also Hashicorp Nomad ( https://www.nomadproject.io/ ) - it's a single executable package, which allows similar setups to Docker Swarm, integrates nicely with service meshes like Consul ( https://www.consul.io/ ), and also allows non-containerized deployments to be managed, such as Java applications and others ( https://www.nomadproject.io/docs/drivers ). The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    There are also some other tools, like CapRover ( https://caprover.com/ ) available, but many of those use Docker Swarm under the hood and i personally haven't used them. Of course, if you still want Kubernetes but implemented in a slightly simpler way, then there's also the Rancher K3s project ( https://k3s.io/ ) which packages the core of Kubernetes into a smaller executable and uses SQLite by default for storage, if i recall correctly. I've used it briefly and the resource usage was indeed far more reasonable than that of full Kubernetes clusters (like RKE).

  • GitHub repo watchtower

    A process for automating Docker container base image updates.

    Then I can track these files via git, and deploy to remote docker hosts using docker-machine, which effectively sets the DOCKER_HOST env var.

    While I haven't used it personally, there is [0] Watchtower which aims to automate updating docker containers.

    [0] https://github.com/containrrr/watchtower

  • GitHub repo hashi-ui

    A modern user interface for @hashicorp Consul & Nomad

    Nomad also scales really well. In my experience swarm had a lot of issues with going above 10 machines in a cluster. Stuck containers, containers that are there but swarm can't see them and more. But still i loved using swarm with my 5 node arm cluster, it is a good place to start when you hit the limit of a single node.

    > The only serious downsides is having to use the HCL DSL ( https://github.com/hashicorp/hcl ) and their web UI being read only in the last versions that i checked.

    1. IIRC you can run jobs directly from UI now, but IMO this is kinda useless. Running a job is simple as 'nomad run jobspec.nomad'. You can also run a great alternative UI ( https://github.com/jippi/hashi-ui ).

    2. IMO HCL > YAML for job definitions. I've used both extensively and HCL always felt much more human friendly. The way K8s uses YAML looks to me like stretching it to it's limits and barely readable at times with templates.

    One thing that makes nomad a go-to for me is that it is able to run workloads pretty much anywhere. Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, Illumos and ofc Mac.

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