Ask HN: Why aren't Django Admin style dashboards popular in other frameworks?

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

Scout Monitoring - Rennaisance engineers rejoice! 1 gem 5 min to app monitoring
5-minute onboarding. No sales team. Devs in the support channels. No DevOps team required. Get the free app insights every engineer deserves with Scout Monitoring.
www.scoutapm.com
featured
InfluxDB - Power Real-Time Data Analytics at Scale
Get real-time insights from all types of time series data with InfluxDB. Ingest, query, and analyze billions of data points in real-time with unbounded cardinality.
www.influxdata.com
featured
  • payload

    The best way to build a modern backend + admin UI. No black magic, all TypeScript, and fully open-source, Payload is both an app framework and a headless CMS.

  • Scout Monitoring

    Rennaisance engineers rejoice! 1 gem 5 min to app monitoring. 5-minute onboarding. No sales team. Devs in the support channels. No DevOps team required. Get the free app insights every engineer deserves with Scout Monitoring.

    Scout Monitoring logo
  • ActiveAdmin

    The administration framework for Ruby on Rails applications.

  • Can you clarify what's the "tremendous value" you're getting out of the Django admin?

    At Heii On-Call https://heiioncall.com/ we are using Active Admin https://activeadmin.info/ for Ruby on Rails, which seems quite similar to the Django admin. In my experience, it's mostly useful as a fairly basic read-only view of what's in the database. In Rails, it's so easy to whip together a custom view that we tend to do that, and the Active Admin is nice to have but I wouldn't say "tremendous value".

  • kaffy

    Powerfully simple admin package for phoenix applications

  • Phoenix has Kaffy: https://github.com/aesmail/kaffy

    Super-simple to set up and it's been perfectly adequate for my app's needs so far.

    To answer OP's original question: Django Admin isn't a killer feature because the same kind of thing is available for most other Django-like frameworks, with the only difference being that it's usually a third party library rather than something built into the framework itself.

  • django-unfold

    Modern Django admin theme for seamless interface development

  • It is not just a UI just for CRUD. You can easily add custom actions (calls to web services, export/imports, heavy background tasks that operate on a row or collections of rows), filters, related tables with custom behavior, display custom derived/calculated values, etc. Additionally, you can skin it easily - and in some cases, even create dashboards in a very simple manner. Check out out Django Unfold for an example https://github.com/unfoldadmin/django-unfold

  • RailsAdmin

    RailsAdmin is a Rails engine that provides an easy-to-use interface for managing your data

  • Like most things, it's probably a combination of things.

    The Django Admin existed before Django publicly existed. That meant that once anyone started using Django they knew that they should constrain their use of Django in certain ways so that the Django Admin would work with their usage. Features that would be added to Django would be built with the Django Admin in mind.

    Many tools like Flask or FastAPI don't have an opinionated model layer like Django. Without that, you can't really create an admin interface programatically. People could be storing their data in any sort of fashion anywhere. How would one build an admin system for something like Flask or FastAPI where there's no convention around how people set up data access? A lot of frameworks out there don't tell you "access your data in this way" or "this is how users will be authenticated." Without those two things, it's hard to really create an admin system.

    There are similar systems available for some frameworks, but since they aren't part of the core framework, they don't get the same attention. Someone creates it, but it doesn't have the kind of community buy-in that sustains it. One of the odd things about Django is that the admin system is under `django.contrib` which indicated that they didn't intend for it to be in the core of Django forever, but that's not really how `django.contrib` ended up. It continued to be a core part of Django maintained as part of the framework.

    Like I said, there are admin dashboards available in other frameworks like RailsAdmin (https://github.com/railsadminteam/rails_admin) or Core Admin for .NET (https://github.com/edandersen/core-admin) and I'm sure there's more. However, both Rails and .NET provide most of what Django provides (and a lot more than most frameworks). Rails and .NET both have a default data access ORM that a majority of people using those frameworks tend to use. .NET has built-in authentication/authorization so the admin can work off that. Rails doesn't have auth, but RailsAdmin uses some plugins.

  • core-admin

    Fully automatic admin site CRUD UI generator for ASP.NET Core and .NET 8

  • Like most things, it's probably a combination of things.

    The Django Admin existed before Django publicly existed. That meant that once anyone started using Django they knew that they should constrain their use of Django in certain ways so that the Django Admin would work with their usage. Features that would be added to Django would be built with the Django Admin in mind.

    Many tools like Flask or FastAPI don't have an opinionated model layer like Django. Without that, you can't really create an admin interface programatically. People could be storing their data in any sort of fashion anywhere. How would one build an admin system for something like Flask or FastAPI where there's no convention around how people set up data access? A lot of frameworks out there don't tell you "access your data in this way" or "this is how users will be authenticated." Without those two things, it's hard to really create an admin system.

    There are similar systems available for some frameworks, but since they aren't part of the core framework, they don't get the same attention. Someone creates it, but it doesn't have the kind of community buy-in that sustains it. One of the odd things about Django is that the admin system is under `django.contrib` which indicated that they didn't intend for it to be in the core of Django forever, but that's not really how `django.contrib` ended up. It continued to be a core part of Django maintained as part of the framework.

    Like I said, there are admin dashboards available in other frameworks like RailsAdmin (https://github.com/railsadminteam/rails_admin) or Core Admin for .NET (https://github.com/edandersen/core-admin) and I'm sure there's more. However, both Rails and .NET provide most of what Django provides (and a lot more than most frameworks). Rails and .NET both have a default data access ORM that a majority of people using those frameworks tend to use. .NET has built-in authentication/authorization so the admin can work off that. Rails doesn't have auth, but RailsAdmin uses some plugins.

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

Suggest a related project

Related posts

  • Looking for feedback and ideas for open source admin tool

    1 project | news.ycombinator.com | 19 May 2024
  • Raspberry Pi as development environment

    1 project | dev.to | 19 May 2024
  • Payload (app framework + CMS in TypeScript) releases 2.0

    1 project | /r/selfhosted | 10 Oct 2023
  • Payload 2.0: Postgres, Live Preview, Lexical RTE, and More

    3 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 10 Oct 2023
  • Payload 2.0 released, TypeScript headless CMS and app framework

    1 project | news.ycombinator.com | 9 Oct 2023