hl-mods VS learning-notes

Compare hl-mods vs learning-notes and see what are their differences.

hl-mods

Modifications for Half-Life on GoldSrc. Includes active development of Cold Ice Remastered. (by solidi)

learning-notes

Notes on books I read, talks I watch, articles I study, and papers I love (by keyvanakbary)
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hl-mods learning-notes
1 6
15 4,932
- -
9.3 0.0
5 days ago 5 months ago
C++ SCSS
GNU General Public License v3.0 or later -
The number of mentions indicates the total number of mentions that we've tracked plus the number of user suggested alternatives.
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hl-mods

Posts with mentions or reviews of hl-mods. We have used some of these posts to build our list of alternatives and similar projects. The last one was on 2021-04-28.
  • Rediscovering the .plan File
    2 projects | dev.to | 28 Apr 2021
    Out of nostalgia, I started a new .plan file that captures the interesting minutiae within the small project. But with the demise of finger, I'm focusing every meaningful clarification from research, behavior, or a [enter your favorite search engine] result in a file I call learnings.md.

learning-notes

Posts with mentions or reviews of learning-notes. We have used some of these posts to build our list of alternatives and similar projects. The last one was on 2023-04-15.
  • What are your thoughts on DDIA?
    1 project | /r/ExperiencedDevs | 16 May 2023
    I only have 2 years of experience but DDIA along with Alex Xu's book have been extremely helpful to me. Here's some other links worth checking out: https://github.com/keyvanakbary/learning-notes/blob/master/books/designing-data-intensive-applications.md ; https://comeshare.net/category/study/system-design/page/2/
  • I discovered that the fastest way to create a Pandas DataFrame from a CSV file is to actually use Polars
    2 projects | /r/Python | 15 Apr 2023
    Wow defensive. Do what works for you, but there are general approaches that people use. This is a good reference text: https://github.com/keyvanakbary/learning-notes/blob/master/books/designing-data-intensive-applications.md
  • Could you please recommend your favorite book in the cybersecurity field?
    1 project | /r/cybersecurity | 23 Aug 2022
    I also read (listened) to this recently and I really liked it! Wish I'd kept notes on some things but then I found an in depth writeup in a gitrepo, SPOILERS so use after reading the book.
  • Any good resources to get started with testing?
    1 project | /r/Frontend | 27 Jul 2022
  • My job search experience with 2 YoE as a backend software engineer
    1 project | /r/cscareerquestionsCAD | 24 Feb 2022
    For systems design, I read through the Designing Data Intensive Applications Summary. Since I already worked with highly distributed and data-intensive systems at work, this was a lot easier for me to digest than I thought. I watched a few systems designs interviews on YouTube, and practiced with a few friends. The cheat codes here are: autoscaling, loadbalancing, trading consistency for consensus, and caches. Learn them and learn them well.
  • Ask HN: What was your experience like moving from an IC to a manager role?
    1 project | news.ycombinator.com | 17 Nov 2021
    I've been going through this transition for the past year or so. And it started out with it being more stressful (e.g., on COVID walks with my wife she noted more days than not I'd be complaining and thinking it best to go back to being an IC).

    But the more I've done it, the more I really enjoy it. It's sort of like having kids (I imagine). I.e., it's sort of insane and counterproductive, but ultimately very satisfying. And as someone else mentioned it's a two-way door (if your engineering interests are long-term).

    I've read probably 20-30 engineering management books in the past year and started our 'manager learning hub' wiki at work. There's a few good books I'll link to below.

    But yeah you will likely have a new peer group of other managers. So you now have your team and your manager peer group. So if you find yourself not learning as much as an IC before (I'd been one more or less for 16 years before starting to transition), it can be a fun new area to learn.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTik4nt1knY

    https://github.com/keyvanakbary/learning-notes (but read the books for real)

    Will Larson's An Elegant Puzzle - Systems of Engineering Management is a nice more modern book. I would balance it with The Empathy Edge by Maria Ross.

    A lot of management theory begins with Peter Drucker (and then Andy Grove and then John Doerr etc. - that OKR lifestyle approach - which has various and basically comes down to focusing on input metrics).

    https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/the-stack-overflow/writ...

    mentions Smart & Gets Things Done (nice final chapter on different types of team challenges). Peopleware though aging has a lot of interesting examples. Leaders Eat Last was recommended to me by another manager. And in general that is basically the sentiment.

    Like having kids, it's an opportunity to reflect on what you would've wanted differently in all the previous managers you have (and a realization that it's tougher than it looks). While managing engineers is different from leadership, it puts leadership on display perhaps more. Your blast radius is bigger. Most companies won't necessarily encourage it right away for ICs because it has a greater negative effect when it doesn't work.

    And yeah to reiterate what others have said - it's a skill (i.e., a set of areas to make mistakes in) that takes time to develop/learn. And I'd say a lot of your growth comes down to who your manager will be in the process. If you have a good manager who mentors (in whichever style), you can learn a whole lot and improve your growth areas fairly quickly.

    Also if you have more of an e2e and slight business focus, it can be interesting. It probably works best for those who are more generalist/breadth-first search types (though if good at communicating and delegating it's not strictly necessary); since there is a lot of "herding" for lack of a better word; and less time to depth-first dive into areas.

    But yeah it gets better with time (or it should - and if it doesn't like I say it should be a two-way door). At first you might be like - what are all these 1:1s and why am I running around so much? And then with time, you'll start looking forward to all your 1:1s. And learning from others re: strategy (in general you'll participate with one level up meetings more; so if you're L6 at a company, you'll start seeing more what L7s see and be asked for input on, if you're responsible for a team). And starting to exhibit the best parts that you've learned before.

    More links for the curious

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3NLetsLYu4

    https://randsinrepose.com/archives/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc

    The experiences I've heard about it (as mentioned here and which I'd reiterate) are that you can't think of your performance in days, but rather in weeks. You "work" through people. Though automation can be your programming outlet. And most importantly it's best to be honest with people. The people on your team everywhere will know when you're trying to cover things up, etc. Senior leaders will know when you're trying to cover things up. So just be honest and open and keep everyone's best interests in mind. And unlike my default learn to be "crisp" :)

What are some alternatives?

When comparing hl-mods and learning-notes you can also consider the following projects:

REFramework - Scripting platform, modding framework and VR support for all RE Engine games

book-notes - Notes from books and other interesting things that I've read. Table of contents at the end 👇

Half-Life-Alyx-novr - SteamVR driver for Half-Life-Alyx for playing without VR / драйвер для игры без VR

hl-alyx-glove - Firmware and Hardware for a Half-Life: Alyx Gravity Glove Replica

halflife-bs-updated - Half-Life: Blue Shift SDK based on Half-Life Updated, with bug fixes. Check README.md for more information.

Highfleet-Modloader - Highfleet Modloader

learning-notes - Notes on books, articles, and interviews