Docusaurus 2.0 – Meta's static site generator to build documentation sites

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

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  • react-native

    A framework for building native applications using React

    > I like include asciidoctor[1] and mdbook [2]. Though I find that even those are overkill for my hobby projects at least ...

    That's one thing: Docusaurus is not necessary just for hobby projects where the doc only exists for yourself and a few users. It can be used for hobby project but it can also scale for much larger projects where the doc is a critical part of the success of the project, and where the company behind is willing to invest thousands of dollars to have a really great doc. For example, the doc of React-Native is critical for React-Native success: https://reactnative.dev

    > I prefer to use them anyway because of support/updates and to leave something others can manage themselves later.

    If you have a small project, you can also use Docusaurus in a very simple way, and stick to our stock template (which looks like this: https://tutorial.docusaurus.io/)

    The only thing you'll need is to leave a folder of Markdown files to your colleagues, that's all.

    I have planned to add a very simple CLI on top of Docusaurus to make it even easier: just run "npx yolodoc ./my-md-docs-folder" and it will build your simple Docusaurus site => No need to install anything, know that it's using React/MDX/TS or whatever: the only thing you'd need is to have Node.js installed (which is not more complicated to install than Python or Ruby btw)

    > This comment seems to show we come from very different worlds. Why do you believe you need JS to create documentation??

    I don't believe that. I believe you can do everything by hand but at some point when you have thousands of docs pages, you also need to be productive and fall into the pit of success by adopting tools that streamline the docs authoring experience for your doc team. Do you prefer throwing 1000h of your time on your home made solution, or just use Docusaurus and save time, and get a better result for something like 200h? => That's the value proposition of Docusaurus.

    Also note that for some accessibility details, you do need to have some JS because using just HTML has its limit. Docusaurus takes great care of accessibility concerns by default for you: progressive enhancement, skip-to-content, aria labels, keyboard navigation, focus rings, semantic html...

    > and if you want to add a little interactivity here and there (e.g. run this code live) you can just embed something like Codepen.io or even, yes, vanilla JS if really necessary.

    There are many places where you probably want JS in your doc site: collapsible categories, search, tabs to switch SDK languages, mobile drawer menu etc... Using just HTML has its limit.

    Now Docusaurus doesn't just bring interactivity to the "layout" but also inside the docs. This makes it possible to build interactive documentation where the experience is natively more "playful"

    https://docusaurus.io/docs/markdown-features/react

  • mdBook

    Create book from markdown files. Like Gitbook but implemented in Rust

    This account is my "anonymous" account, so I can't give you an example of what docs I can create myself... but docs systems I like include asciidoctor[1] and mdbook [2]. Though I find that even those are overkill for my hobby projects at least ... professionally, I prefer to use them anyway because of support/updates and to leave something others can manage themselves later.

    > Now you can definitively get a similar experience with vanilla JS

    This comment seems to show we come from very different worlds. Why do you believe you need JS to create documentation?? Have you tried writing HTML/CSS without any generator/JS/tools? It's actually pretty easy... Documentation is mostly static, which HTML/CSS was designed to create... and if you want to add a little interactivity here and there (e.g. run this code live) you can just embed something like Codepen.io or even, yes, vanilla JS if really necessary.

    I do agree your tool is quite amazing... the fact it takes care of verifying crosslinking, for example, is great... but I hope you do understand that you're using a heavy-weight tool to do something that's usually pretty basic (or maybe you think of docs as something much, much more advanced than what I think of - like the Rust Docs to me are a good example of great docs and I can't even think of why anyone would need anything more advanced - I think you would find that far from advanced? Othewise, you'd agree you can easily write that by hand with HTML/CSS and a little scripting around perhaps to do crosslinking, md-to-html conversion and simple stuff like that).

    [1] https://docs.asciidoctor.org/asciidoctor/latest/

    [2] https://rust-lang.github.io/mdBook/

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  • Docusaurus

    Easy to maintain open source documentation websites.

    You can restrict docs access by using Http basic auth at the host level (CDNs like Vercel/Netlify/Cloudflare usually provide this feature).

    If you want in-app authentication, remember we are a static site generator so at the end of the day we have to produce static html files, and at build time we can't know which user it is. You can use a client-side authentication where your HTML first render a profile placeholder and then the profile data gets loaded with an auth request. You can also render a full-screen spinner on the static page, and then use React client-side to auth the user.

    See also: https://github.com/facebook/docusaurus/issues/958#issuecomme...

  • tauri

    Build smaller, faster, and more secure desktop applications with a web frontend.

  • notes

    Collection of my byte sized notes on programming and other random topics. (by mr-karan)

    I'm so happy with Material Mkdocs[1]. I use Obsidian to write a bunch of notes and then combine that with a bunch of mkdocs plugins to generate a static site out of it [2].

    What does Docusaurus offer more, if anyone who's used both can compare?

    [1]: https://squidfunk.github.io/mkdocs-material/

    [2]: https://github.com/mr-karan/notes

  • mkdocs-material

    Documentation that simply works

    I'm so happy with Material Mkdocs[1]. I use Obsidian to write a bunch of notes and then combine that with a bunch of mkdocs plugins to generate a static site out of it [2].

    What does Docusaurus offer more, if anyone who's used both can compare?

    [1]: https://squidfunk.github.io/mkdocs-material/

    [2]: https://github.com/mr-karan/notes

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  • MkDocs

    Project documentation with Markdown.

    If you are looking for a similar markdown-to-docs-site tool but don't want to run javascript outside of a browser, MkDocs is great: https://www.mkdocs.org/

  • docs

    Courier Documentation (by trycourier)

  • ionic-docs

  • swc

    Rust-based platform for the Web

    IMHO Rust is useful for its speed. Many frontend tools use Rust today (like swc, napi-rs...).

    We are willing to include Rust in Docusaurus in the future (alongside Node.js), as it can help to build the static doc site faster. BTW our docusaurus prod site (docusaurus.io) is built using swc already (https://swc.rs/)

    Now using a 100% Rust tool to build a doc site would be great too, but at the end of the day if you want a great experience you'll also need some JS and not just plain static HTML files. And Rust devs are more likely less "frontend-y" (I've been a backend Scala dev 10 years ago, I know how good looking UIs are produced by backend devs ^^). So I guess a combination of Node.js + Rust is great, and the frontend community that care about UI/UX is more likely to contribute to the JS side to polish things.

  • blog.johnnyreilly.com

    This is the source code for blog.johnnyreilly.com

    Thanks a lot Johnny

    Just sharing your blog url for the interested: https://blog.johnnyreilly.com/

    We also have a lot of other personal website/blogs in our site showcase: https://docusaurus.io/showcase?tags=personal

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    Enjoy our curated collection of examples and solutions. Use these patterns to build your own robust and scalable applications. (by vercel)

    If you’re using Vercel, here’s an example: https://github.com/vercel/examples/tree/main/edge-functions/...

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    Backup your Obsidian.md vault with git

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