Show HN: Open-source, browser-local data exploration using DuckDB-WASM and PRQL

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

SurveyJS - Open-Source JSON Form Builder to Create Dynamic Forms Right in Your App
With SurveyJS form UI libraries, you can build and style forms in a fully-integrated drag & drop form builder, render them in your JS app, and store form submission data in any backend, inc. PHP, ASP.NET Core, and Node.js.
surveyjs.io
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InfluxDB - Power Real-Time Data Analytics at Scale
Get real-time insights from all types of time series data with InfluxDB. Ingest, query, and analyze billions of data points in real-time with unbounded cardinality.
www.influxdata.com
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  • pretzelai

    Open-source, browser-local data exploration using DuckDB-Wasm and PRQL

  • uDSV

    A faster CSV parser in 5KB (min)

  • Hey HN! We’ve built Pretzel, an open-source data exploration and visualization tool that runs fully in the browser and can handle large files (200 MB CSV on my 8gb MacBook air is snappy). It’s also reactive - so if, for example, you change a filter, all the data transform blocks after it re-evaluate automatically. You can try it here: https://pretzelai.github.io/ (static hosted webpage) or see a demo video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73wNEun_L7w

    You can play with the demo CSV that’s pre-loaded (GitHub data of text-editor adjacent projects) or upload your own CSV/XLSX file. The tool runs fully in-browser—you can disconnect from the internet once the website loads—so feel free to use sensitive data if you like.

    Here’s how it works: You upload a CSV file and then, explore your data as a series of successive data transforms and plots. For example, you might: (1) Remove some columns; (2) Apply some filters (remove nulls, remove outliers, restrict time range etc); (3) Do a pivot (i.e, a group-by but fancier); (4) Plot a chart; (5) Download the chart and the the transformed data. See screenshot: https://imgur.com/a/qO4yURI

    In the UI, each transform step appears as a “Block”. You can always see the result of the full transform in a table on the right. The transform blocks are editable - for instance in the example above, you can go to step 2, change some filters and the reactivity will take care of re-computing all the cells that follow, including the charts.

    We wanted Pretzel to run locally in the browser and be extremely performant on large files. So, we parse CSVs with the fastest CSV parser (uDSV: https://github.com/leeoniya/uDSV) and use DuckDB-Wasm (https://github.com/duckdb/duckdb-wasm) to do all the heavy lifting of processing the data. We also wanted to allow for chained data transformations where each new block operates on the result of the previous block. For this, we’re using PRQL (https://prql-lang.org/) since it maps 1-1 with chained data transform blocks - each block maps to a chunk of PRQL which when combined, describes the full data transform chain. (PRQL doesn’t support DuckDB’s Pivot statement though so we had to make some CTE based hacks).

    There’s also an AI block: This is the only (optional) feature that requires an internet connection but we’re working on adding local model support via Ollama. For now, you can use your own OpenAI API key or use an AI server we provide (GPT4 proxy; it’s loaded with a few credits), specify a transform in plain english and get back the SQL for the transform which you can edit.

    Our roadmap includes allowing API calls to create new columns; support for an SQL block with nice autocomplete features, and a Python block (using Pyodide to run Python in the browser) on the results of the data transforms, much like a jupyter notebook.

    There’s two of us and we’ve only spent about a week coding this and fixing major bugs so there are still some bugs to iron out. We’d love for you to try this and to get your feedback!

  • SurveyJS

    Open-Source JSON Form Builder to Create Dynamic Forms Right in Your App. With SurveyJS form UI libraries, you can build and style forms in a fully-integrated drag & drop form builder, render them in your JS app, and store form submission data in any backend, inc. PHP, ASP.NET Core, and Node.js.

    SurveyJS logo
  • prql

    PRQL is a modern language for transforming data — a simple, powerful, pipelined SQL replacement

  • Hey HN! We’ve built Pretzel, an open-source data exploration and visualization tool that runs fully in the browser and can handle large files (200 MB CSV on my 8gb MacBook air is snappy). It’s also reactive - so if, for example, you change a filter, all the data transform blocks after it re-evaluate automatically. You can try it here: https://pretzelai.github.io/ (static hosted webpage) or see a demo video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73wNEun_L7w

    You can play with the demo CSV that’s pre-loaded (GitHub data of text-editor adjacent projects) or upload your own CSV/XLSX file. The tool runs fully in-browser—you can disconnect from the internet once the website loads—so feel free to use sensitive data if you like.

    Here’s how it works: You upload a CSV file and then, explore your data as a series of successive data transforms and plots. For example, you might: (1) Remove some columns; (2) Apply some filters (remove nulls, remove outliers, restrict time range etc); (3) Do a pivot (i.e, a group-by but fancier); (4) Plot a chart; (5) Download the chart and the the transformed data. See screenshot: https://imgur.com/a/qO4yURI

    In the UI, each transform step appears as a “Block”. You can always see the result of the full transform in a table on the right. The transform blocks are editable - for instance in the example above, you can go to step 2, change some filters and the reactivity will take care of re-computing all the cells that follow, including the charts.

    We wanted Pretzel to run locally in the browser and be extremely performant on large files. So, we parse CSVs with the fastest CSV parser (uDSV: https://github.com/leeoniya/uDSV) and use DuckDB-Wasm (https://github.com/duckdb/duckdb-wasm) to do all the heavy lifting of processing the data. We also wanted to allow for chained data transformations where each new block operates on the result of the previous block. For this, we’re using PRQL (https://prql-lang.org/) since it maps 1-1 with chained data transform blocks - each block maps to a chunk of PRQL which when combined, describes the full data transform chain. (PRQL doesn’t support DuckDB’s Pivot statement though so we had to make some CTE based hacks).

    There’s also an AI block: This is the only (optional) feature that requires an internet connection but we’re working on adding local model support via Ollama. For now, you can use your own OpenAI API key or use an AI server we provide (GPT4 proxy; it’s loaded with a few credits), specify a transform in plain english and get back the SQL for the transform which you can edit.

    Our roadmap includes allowing API calls to create new columns; support for an SQL block with nice autocomplete features, and a Python block (using Pyodide to run Python in the browser) on the results of the data transforms, much like a jupyter notebook.

    There’s two of us and we’ve only spent about a week coding this and fixing major bugs so there are still some bugs to iron out. We’d love for you to try this and to get your feedback!

  • duckdb-wasm

    WebAssembly version of DuckDB

  • Hey HN! We’ve built Pretzel, an open-source data exploration and visualization tool that runs fully in the browser and can handle large files (200 MB CSV on my 8gb MacBook air is snappy). It’s also reactive - so if, for example, you change a filter, all the data transform blocks after it re-evaluate automatically. You can try it here: https://pretzelai.github.io/ (static hosted webpage) or see a demo video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73wNEun_L7w

    You can play with the demo CSV that’s pre-loaded (GitHub data of text-editor adjacent projects) or upload your own CSV/XLSX file. The tool runs fully in-browser—you can disconnect from the internet once the website loads—so feel free to use sensitive data if you like.

    Here’s how it works: You upload a CSV file and then, explore your data as a series of successive data transforms and plots. For example, you might: (1) Remove some columns; (2) Apply some filters (remove nulls, remove outliers, restrict time range etc); (3) Do a pivot (i.e, a group-by but fancier); (4) Plot a chart; (5) Download the chart and the the transformed data. See screenshot: https://imgur.com/a/qO4yURI

    In the UI, each transform step appears as a “Block”. You can always see the result of the full transform in a table on the right. The transform blocks are editable - for instance in the example above, you can go to step 2, change some filters and the reactivity will take care of re-computing all the cells that follow, including the charts.

    We wanted Pretzel to run locally in the browser and be extremely performant on large files. So, we parse CSVs with the fastest CSV parser (uDSV: https://github.com/leeoniya/uDSV) and use DuckDB-Wasm (https://github.com/duckdb/duckdb-wasm) to do all the heavy lifting of processing the data. We also wanted to allow for chained data transformations where each new block operates on the result of the previous block. For this, we’re using PRQL (https://prql-lang.org/) since it maps 1-1 with chained data transform blocks - each block maps to a chunk of PRQL which when combined, describes the full data transform chain. (PRQL doesn’t support DuckDB’s Pivot statement though so we had to make some CTE based hacks).

    There’s also an AI block: This is the only (optional) feature that requires an internet connection but we’re working on adding local model support via Ollama. For now, you can use your own OpenAI API key or use an AI server we provide (GPT4 proxy; it’s loaded with a few credits), specify a transform in plain english and get back the SQL for the transform which you can edit.

    Our roadmap includes allowing API calls to create new columns; support for an SQL block with nice autocomplete features, and a Python block (using Pyodide to run Python in the browser) on the results of the data transforms, much like a jupyter notebook.

    There’s two of us and we’ve only spent about a week coding this and fixing major bugs so there are still some bugs to iron out. We’d love for you to try this and to get your feedback!

  • dplyr

    dplyr: A grammar of data manipulation

  • That's great feedback, thanks!

    This tool definitely comes from a place of personal need - beyond just handling large files, I've also never really gelled well with the Excel/Google Sheet model of changing data in place as if you were editing text. I'm a Data Scientist and always preferred the chained data transforms you see in things like dplyr (https://dplyr.tidyverse.org/) or Polars (https://pola.rs/) and I feel this tool maps very closely to the chained model.

    Also, thank you for the feature requests! Those would all be very useful - we'll put them on the roadmap.

  • pgress

    Native PostgreSQL JavaScript client library for web browsers

  • Hey Marco, I'll take a look - filters theoretically should be fast, when you create a new filter, it simply reads does a `select * from table limit 1` to get column names

    I wasn't sure whether you could query DBs directly from the browser but looks like you can! (https://github.com/alexanderguy/pgress) - will add it to roadmap!

  • pyodide

    Pyodide is a Python distribution for the browser and Node.js based on WebAssembly

  • Thank you! Yes, one of the items in the Roadmap is support for Pyodide (https://github.com/pyodide/pyodide) for running in-browser python on the results of each of the code blocks! This should allow most ML libs to be usable in-browser! This is pretty high-up on our priority list.

  • InfluxDB

    Power Real-Time Data Analytics at Scale. Get real-time insights from all types of time series data with InfluxDB. Ingest, query, and analyze billions of data points in real-time with unbounded cardinality.

    InfluxDB logo
  • graphic-walker

    An open source alternative to Tableau. Embeddable visual analytic

  • [2] https://github.com/Kanaries/graphic-walker/issues/330

  • calculang

    calculang is a language for calculations 🧮💬👩‍💻

  • tad

    A desktop application for viewing and analyzing tabular data

  • Very impressive project and vision! Love the demo!

    I am also ex-GS and worked on what I am fairly sure is the table display tool you're describing. I tried to carry the essential aspects of that work (multi-level pivots, with drill-down to the leaf level, and all interactive events and analytics supported by db queries) to Tad (https://www.tadviewer.com/, https://github.com/antonycourtney/tad), another open source project powered by DuckDb.

    An embeddable version of Tad, powered by DuckDb WASM, is used as the results viewer in the MotherDuck Web UI (https://app.motherduck.com/).

    If you're interested in embedding Tad in Pretzel, or leveraging pieces of it in your work, or collaborating on other aspects of DuckDb WASM powered UIs, please get in touch!

  • meerkat

  • We faced a similar situation at https://devrev.ai/ a few months back, but we decided to go fully client side rather than using server side solutions like Cube. We developed our own open-source library Meerkat (https://github.com/devrev/meerkat) which allows you to generate and execute SQL queries in the browser.

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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