minio

The Object Store for AI Data Infrastructure (by minio)

Minio Alternatives

Similar projects and alternatives to minio

  • Seaweed File System

    Discontinued SeaweedFS is a fast distributed storage system for blobs, objects, files, and data lake, for billions of files! Blob store has O(1) disk seek, cloud tiering. Filer supports Cloud Drive, cross-DC active-active replication, Kubernetes, POSIX FUSE mount, S3 API, S3 Gateway, Hadoop, WebDAV, encryption, Erasure Coding. [Moved to: https://github.com/seaweedfs/seaweedfs] (by chrislusf)

  • Nextcloud

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  • LearnThisRepo.com

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  • Samba

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  • GlusterFS

    Gluster Filesystem : Build your distributed storage in minutes

  • seaweedfs

    SeaweedFS is a fast distributed storage system for blobs, objects, files, and data lake, for billions of files! Blob store has O(1) disk seek, cloud tiering. Filer supports Cloud Drive, cross-DC active-active replication, Kubernetes, POSIX FUSE mount, S3 API, S3 Gateway, Hadoop, WebDAV, encryption, Erasure Coding.

  • Swift

    - minio VS Swift

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  • WorkOS

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  • SFTPGo

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  • etcd

    - minio VS etcd

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  • buck2

    2 minio VS buck2

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  • arozos

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  • goseaweedfs

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  • Go IPFS

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  • node

    1 minio VS node

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    1 minio VS Mastodon

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  • rclone

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  • InfluxDB

    1 minio VS InfluxDB

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  • pnpm

    1 minio VS pnpm

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  • MongoDB

    1 minio VS MongoDB

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  • zstd

    1 minio VS zstd

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  • InfluxDB

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NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a better minio alternative or higher similarity.

minio reviews and mentions

Posts with mentions or reviews of minio. We have used some of these posts to build our list of alternatives and similar projects. The last one was on 2024-02-22.
  • A Distributed File System in Go Cut Average Metadata Memory Usage to 100 Bytes
    2 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 22 Feb 2024
    Looks like minio added this in 2022:

    https://github.com/minio/minio/pull/15433

  • Ask HN: I have 10 yrs of Exp. Failed 4 takehome projects. What am I doing wrong?
    7 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 11 Jul 2023
    >Again, here you seem to be arguing against a strawman that doesn't know that blocking the IO loop is bad. Try arguing against one that knows ways to work around that. This is why I'm saying this rule isn't true. Extensive computation on single-threaded "scripting" languages is possible (and even if it wasn't, punt it off to a remote pool of workers, which could also be NodeJS!).

    Very rare to find a rule that's absolutely true.. I clearly stated exceptions to the rule (which you repeated) but the generality is still true.

    Threading in nodejs is new and didn't exist since the last time I touched it. It looks like it's not the standard use case as google searches still have websites with titles saying node is single threaded everywhere. The only way I can see this being done is multiple Processes (meaning each with a copy of v8) using OS shared memory as IPC and they're just calling it threads. It will take a shit load of work to make v8 actually multi-threaded.

    Processes are expensive so you can't really follow this model per request. And we stopped following threading per request over a decade ago.

    Again these are exceptions to the rule, from what I'm reading Nodejs is normally still single threaded with a fixed number of worker processes that are called "threads". Under this my general rule is still generally true: backend engineering does no typically involve writing non blocking code and offloading compute to other sources. Again, there are exceptions but as I stated before these exceptions are rare.

    >Here's what I mean -- you can actually solve the ordering problem in O(N) + O(M) time by keeping track of the max you've seen and building a sparse array and running through every single index from max to zero. It's overkill, but it's generally referred to as a counting sort:

    Oh come on. We both know these sorts won't work. These large numbers will throw off memory. Imagine 3 routes. One route gets 352 hits, another route gets 400 hits, and another route gets 600,000 hits. What's Big Oh for memory and sort?

    It's O(600,000) for both memory and runtime. N=3 and it doesn't even matter here. Yeah these types of sorts are almost never used for this reason, they only work for things with smaller ranges. It's also especially not useful for this project. Like this project was designed so "counting sort" fails big time.

    Also we don't need to talk about the O(N) read and write. That's a given it's always there.

    >I don't think these statements make sense -- having docker installed and having redis installed are basically equivalent work. At the end of the day, the outcome is the same -- the developer is capable of running redis locally. Having redis installed on your local machine is absolutely within range for a backend developer.

    Unfortunately these statements do make sense and your characterization seems completely dishonest to me. People like to keep their local environments pure and segregated away from daemons that run in a web server. I'm sure in your universe you are claiming web developers install redis, postgresql and kafka all locally but that just sounds absurd to me. We can agree to disagree but from my perspective I don't think you're being realistic here.

    >Also, remote development is not practiced by many companies -- the only companies I've seen doing thin-clients that are large.

    It's practiced by a large amount and basically every company I've worked at for the past 5 years. Every company has to at least partially do remote dev in order to fully test E2E stuff or integrations.

    >I see it as just spinning up docker, not compose -- you already have access to the app (ex. if it was buildable via a function) so you could spawn redis in a subprocess (or container) on a random port, and then spawn the app.

    Sure. The point is it's hacky to do this without an existing framework. I'll check out that library you linked.

    >I agree that integration testing is harder -- I think there's more value there.

    Of course there's more value. You get more value at higher cost. That's been my entire point.

    >Also, for replicating S3, minio (https://github.com/minio/minio) is a good stand-in. For replicating lambda, localstack (https://docs.localstack.cloud/user-guide/aws/lambda/) is probably reasonable there's also frameworks with some consideration for this (https://www.serverless.com/framework/docs/providers/aws/guid...) built in.

    Good finds. But what about SNS, IOT, Big Query and Redshift? Again my problem isn't about specific services, it's about infra in general.

    >Ah, this is true -- but I think this is what people are testing in interviews. There is a predominant culture/shared values, and the test is literally whether someone can fit into those values.

    No. I think what's going on is people aren't putting much thought into what they're actually interviewing for. They just have some made up bar in their mind whether it's a leetcode algorithm or whether the guy wrote a unit test for the one available pure function for testing.

    >Whether they should or should not be, that's at least partially what interviews are -- does the new team member feel the same way about technical culture currently shared by the team.

    The answer is no. There's always developers who disagree with things and just don't reveal it. Think about the places you worked at. Were you in total agreement? I doubt it. A huge amount of devs are opinionated and think company policies or practices are BS. People adapt.

    >Now in the case of this interview your solution was just fine, even excellent (because you went out of your way to do async io, use newer/easier packaging methodologies, etc), but it's clearly not just that.

    The testing is just a game. I can play the game and suddenly I pass all the interviews. I think this is the flaw with your methodology as I just need to write tests to get in. Google for example in spirit attempted another method which involves testing IQ via algorithms. It's a much higher bar

    The problem with google is that their methodology can also be gamed but it's much harder to game it and often the bar is too high for the actual job the engineer is expected to do.

    I think both methodologies are flawed, but hiring via ignoring raw ability and picking people based off of weirdly specific cultural preferences is the worse of the two hiring methodologies.

    Put it this way. If a company has a strong testing culture, then engineers who don't typically test things will adapt. It's not hard to do, and testing isn't so annoying that they won't do it.

    7 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 11 Jul 2023
    > Docker is not the problem. Docker or virtual machines makes this problem more amenable to a solution, but even using docker here with testing is overkill and hacky. A take home should not expect a user to build excessive infrastructure locally just to run tests.

    I don't think these statements make sense -- having docker installed and having redis installed are basically equivalent work. At the end of the day, the outcome is the same -- the developer is capable of running redis locally. Having redis installed on your local machine is absolutely within range for a backend developer.

    Also, remote development is not practiced by many companies -- the only companies I've seen doing thin-clients that are large.

    > Maybe for this take home project you could be right. I could do some integration tests by spinning up docker-compose from within python. Hacky but doable. But in general this solution is not production scalable as production involves more things then what can be placed inside a docker-compose.

    I see it as just spinning up docker, not compose -- you already have access to the app (ex. if it was buildable via a function) so you could spawn redis in a subprocess (or container) on a random port, and then spawn the app.

    I agree that it is not trivial, but the value is high (in mymind.

    > Yeah it's 2023, you tell me how integration testing should be done as easily as unit testing on a takehome. I had one takehome project involving S3 and aws lambdas. They expected me to get an AWS account and literally set up infrastructure because there's no way around even testing what I wrote without actual infrastructure. That entire project was just integration test nightmare. Much rather run asserts locally.

    I agree that integration testing is harder -- I think there's more value there.

    Also, for replicating S3, minio (https://github.com/minio/minio) is a good stand-in. For replicating lambda, localstack (https://docs.localstack.cloud/user-guide/aws/lambda/) is probably reasonable there's also frameworks with some consideration for this (https://www.serverless.com/framework/docs/providers/aws/guid...) built in.

    That said I do think that's a weakness of the platform compute stuff -- it is inconvenient to test lambda outside of lambda.

    > Well I mean 99% of hires get into a context where they aren't in full control. So why is it logical to test what a developer will do if he/she had full control? Isn't it better to test the developers ability to code and to adapt to different contexts? Your methodology sort of just tests the programmers personal philosophy and whether it matches your own. That was my point.

    Ah, this is true -- but I think this is what people are testing in interviews. There is a predominant culture/shared values, and the test is literally whether someone can fit into those values.

    Whether they should or should not be, that's at least partially what interviews are -- does the new team member feel the same way about technical culture currently shared by the team.

    Now in the case of this interview your solution was just fine, even excellent (because you went out of your way to do async io, use newer/easier packaging methodologies, etc), but it's clearly not just that.

  • What's the best AWS S3 protocol alternative?
    3 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 31 May 2023
    Maybe Minio: https://github.com/minio/minio / https://min.io

    I've only used it as a fairly straight forward object store though, so not sure about privileges/permissions (etc).

    3 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 31 May 2023
    You say protocol alternative, but assuming you're more concerned with AWS as the host than S3 as the protocol you might try https://github.com/minio/minio

    If you do feel an aversion to the protocol then the rclone backend list would be a good starting point

    https://rclone.org/overview/

    3 projects | news.ycombinator.com | 31 May 2023
  • Reason to use other Build Tool than Make?
    9 projects | /r/golang | 19 May 2023
    You could refer to big OSS project Makefiles to take a look, what could be there, for example: https://github.com/minio/minio/blob/master/Makefile
  • Looking for a Backblaze B2 compatible cloud backup application for Linux that uses standard file level (not block level) ZIP encryption (and with GUI would be nice).
    3 projects | /r/DataHoarder | 16 May 2023
    Backblaze's B2 is compatible with AWS S3 that also implemented in selfhosted minio
  • 求推荐一个能用脚本或者API上传更新文件的网盘
    2 projects | /r/China_irl | 11 May 2023
  • Selfhosted file share requiring authorised URL to upload
    2 projects | /r/selfhosted | 3 Apr 2023
    https://github.com/minio/minio is what comes to my mind
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    learnthisrepo.com | 29 Feb 2024
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Stats

Basic minio repo stats
99
43,139
9.7
7 days ago

minio/minio is an open source project licensed under GNU Affero General Public License v3.0 which is an OSI approved license.

minio is marked as "self-hosted". This means that it can be used as a standalone application on its own.

The primary programming language of minio is Go.

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