Astro 1.0

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

Our great sponsors
  • Appwrite - The Open Source Firebase alternative introduces iOS support
  • Scout APM - Truly a developer’s best friend
  • SonarQube - Static code analysis for 29 languages.
  • talent.io - Download talent.io’s Tech Salary Report
  • astro

    Build faster websites with Astro's next-gen island architecture 🏝✨

    As long as you have npm installed it'll work. Npm create is an alias for the npm init command [1], which will look for a package with the prefix 'create-', install it, and run its bin file. It looks like this is the file that ends up being run: https://github.com/withastro/astro/blob/main/packages/create....

    [1] https://docs.npmjs.com/cli/v8/commands/npm-init

  • Hugo

    The world’s fastest framework for building websites.

    Hugo (https://gohugo.io) maybe? I tried it for a small static site about internal documentation, and I'm very glad I did. The hardest part was reading the documentation, the installation, content generation and rebuilds were painless.

  • Appwrite

    Appwrite - The Open Source Firebase alternative introduces iOS support . Appwrite is an open source backend server that helps you build native iOS applications much faster with realtime APIs for authentication, databases, files storage, cloud functions and much more!

  • Publii

    Publii is a desktop-based CMS for Windows, Mac and Linux that makes creating static websites fast and hassle-free, even for beginners.

    Not sure if you've heard of Publii?[0]

    It's a static blog generator type thing, tried it a few times casually and it seems ok for non-devs to get something simple up and running.

    The SEO defaults aren't perfect but they're easy enough to change in the software.

    [0] https://getpublii.com

  • eleventy 🕚⚡️

    A simpler static site generator. An alternative to Jekyll. Transforms a directory of templates (of varying types) into HTML.

    Check out Eleventy[0] - written in JavaScript but largely no-nonsense with (relatively) few dependencies.

    [0] https://www.11ty.dev/

  • Caddy

    Fast and extensible multi-platform HTTP/3 web server with automatic HTTPS

    To add onto this, we recently added plugin support for templates, so you can write your own template functions if you'd like! https://github.com/caddyserver/caddy/pull/4757

  • gutenberg

    A fast static site generator in a single binary with everything built-in. https://www.getzola.org

  • j2cli

    Jinja2 Command-Line Tool, reworked

  • Scout APM

    Truly a developer’s best friend. Scout APM is great for developers who want to find and fix performance issues in their applications. With Scout, we'll take care of the bugs so you can focus on building great things 🚀.

  • tup

    Tup is a file-based build system.

  • primo

    Primo is a component-based CMS that makes it easy to build visually-editable static sites

    That same thinking is what led me to build [Primo](https://github.com/primodotso/primo) - a SSG in a desktop/server CMS. It’s the only thing me or anyone I know who’s uses it uses to build normal websites anymore bc it’s so much faster to get a site up and easier to write code/content.

  • solid-site

    Code that powers the SolidJS.com platform.

    I haven’t done any serious work with either, but I’ve been following both closely (and have contributed a bit to Astro early on). So this isn’t the hands-on response you specifically asked for, and may not contain new information to you. I’m posting anyway in case it adds context for others.

    Qwik City[1] is probably more directly analogous to Astro, Qwik being more analogous to Astro’s integrated renderers. But that highlights one of the key differences.

    Astro’s compiler mostly focuses on server rendering of static content (.astro templates, MDX) and bundling client resources along with the logic necessary to hydrate islands. Astro defers to those renderers (and in some cases their own compilers) for any further optimization of the client bundle.

    Qwik’s compiler optimizes the component code directly, serializing state into the HTML it renders server-side, for the client bundle to resume from that state. Its output is conceptually similar to Phoenix LiveView (which was mentioned in another sub-thread).

    Both are compelling approaches. I think Qwik’s will probably (eventually) have an optimization advantage because that’s a core focus of the client library. Astro will likely have an adoption advantage because it’s client-library-agnostic.

    Another framework in the space often gets passed over: Marko[2], which has been doing partial hydration for years at eBay. Marko is probably more similar in approach to Qwik (and as I understand it, getting more similar as they’re going resumable too), but like Astro has its own templating language which enables its compiler optimizations.

    Also worth watching SolidJS[3] (whose creator has also worked on Marko), which is tracking partial hydration/resumability on its roadmap. I’m not sure what their approach will look like but there’s quite a lot of insight both in the issue and the creator’s tweets/replies on the topic.

    Personally I think there’s a gap between all of these approaches which could leverage type-level analysis to go much further. But that isn’t really feasible when types being available or accurate isn’t a safe assumption.

    1: https://qwik.builder.io/qwikcity/overview

    2: https://markojs.com/

    3: https://www.solidjs.com/

  • marko

    A declarative, HTML-based language that makes building web apps fun

    I haven’t done any serious work with either, but I’ve been following both closely (and have contributed a bit to Astro early on). So this isn’t the hands-on response you specifically asked for, and may not contain new information to you. I’m posting anyway in case it adds context for others.

    Qwik City[1] is probably more directly analogous to Astro, Qwik being more analogous to Astro’s integrated renderers. But that highlights one of the key differences.

    Astro’s compiler mostly focuses on server rendering of static content (.astro templates, MDX) and bundling client resources along with the logic necessary to hydrate islands. Astro defers to those renderers (and in some cases their own compilers) for any further optimization of the client bundle.

    Qwik’s compiler optimizes the component code directly, serializing state into the HTML it renders server-side, for the client bundle to resume from that state. Its output is conceptually similar to Phoenix LiveView (which was mentioned in another sub-thread).

    Both are compelling approaches. I think Qwik’s will probably (eventually) have an optimization advantage because that’s a core focus of the client library. Astro will likely have an adoption advantage because it’s client-library-agnostic.

    Another framework in the space often gets passed over: Marko[2], which has been doing partial hydration for years at eBay. Marko is probably more similar in approach to Qwik (and as I understand it, getting more similar as they’re going resumable too), but like Astro has its own templating language which enables its compiler optimizations.

    Also worth watching SolidJS[3] (whose creator has also worked on Marko), which is tracking partial hydration/resumability on its roadmap. I’m not sure what their approach will look like but there’s quite a lot of insight both in the issue and the creator’s tweets/replies on the topic.

    Personally I think there’s a gap between all of these approaches which could leverage type-level analysis to go much further. But that isn’t really feasible when types being available or accurate isn’t a safe assumption.

    1: https://qwik.builder.io/qwikcity/overview

    2: https://markojs.com/

    3: https://www.solidjs.com/

  • serverless-next.js

    ⚡ Deploy your Next.js apps on AWS [email protected] via Serverless Components

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

Suggest a related project

Related posts