I deleted 78% of my Redis container and it still works

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

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  • Lean and Mean Docker containers

    Slim(toolkit): Don't change anything in your container image and minify it by up to 30x (and for compiled languages even more) making it secure too! (free and open source)

    Maybe this would help in that regard: https://github.com/docker-slim/docker-slim

  • distroless

    🥑 Language focused docker images, minus the operating system.

    See: Distroless images[0]

    This is one of the huge benefits of recent systems languages like go and rust -- they compile to single binaries so you can use things like scatch[1] containers. You may have to fiddle with gnu libc/musl libc (usually when getaddrinfo is involved/dns etc), but once you're done with it, packaging is so easy.

    Even languages like Node (IMO the most progressive of the scripting languages) have packages like vercel/pkg[2] which produce native binaries.

    BTW if you're considering running redis these days... Check out KeyDB[3], it's impressive. There are a lot of redis alternatives with interesting features these days that I wonder if running vanilla redis is even a good idea anymore (outside of ensuring complete feature-set compatibility).

    [0]: https://github.com/GoogleContainerTools/distroless

    [1]: https://hub.docker.com/_/scratch/

    [2]: https://github.com/vercel/pkg

    [3]: https://docs.keydb.dev

  • InfluxDB

    Build time-series-based applications quickly and at scale.. InfluxDB is the Time Series Platform where developers build real-time applications for analytics, IoT and cloud-native services. Easy to start, it is available in the cloud or on-premises.

  • pkg

    Package your Node.js project into an executable

    See: Distroless images[0]

    This is one of the huge benefits of recent systems languages like go and rust -- they compile to single binaries so you can use things like scatch[1] containers. You may have to fiddle with gnu libc/musl libc (usually when getaddrinfo is involved/dns etc), but once you're done with it, packaging is so easy.

    Even languages like Node (IMO the most progressive of the scripting languages) have packages like vercel/pkg[2] which produce native binaries.

    BTW if you're considering running redis these days... Check out KeyDB[3], it's impressive. There are a lot of redis alternatives with interesting features these days that I wonder if running vanilla redis is even a good idea anymore (outside of ensuring complete feature-set compatibility).

    [0]: https://github.com/GoogleContainerTools/distroless

    [1]: https://hub.docker.com/_/scratch/

    [2]: https://github.com/vercel/pkg

    [3]: https://docs.keydb.dev

  • Tendis

    Tendis is a high-performance distributed storage system fully compatible with the Redis protocol.

  • SSDB

    SSDB - A fast NoSQL database, an alternative to Redis

  • KeyDB

    A Multithreaded Fork of Redis

  • dynomite

    A generic dynamo implementation for different k-v storage engines

  • SonarQube

    Static code analysis for 29 languages.. Your projects are multi-language. So is SonarQube analysis. Find Bugs, Vulnerabilities, Security Hotspots, and Code Smells so you can release quality code every time. Get started analyzing your projects today for free.

  • tidis

    Distributed transactional NoSQL database, Redis protocol compatible using tikv as backend

  • anna

    A low-latency, cloud-native KVS

  • ledisdb

    A high performance NoSQL Database Server powered by Go

  • codis

    Proxy based Redis cluster solution supporting pipeline and scaling dynamically

  • xcodis

    Yet another redis proxy based on codis(https://github.com/wandoulabs/codis)

  • minideb

    A small image based on Debian designed for use in containers

    as is stated initially, that goes back to how bitnami is building its Docker images, basing on a set of debian packages (minideb) - there's also a shell library/framework embedded that does useful things, but that makes you read more code when you go check how the sausage is made. That minideb is the basis for the higher CVE count compared to scratch or alpine images.

    > it’s a well-kept secret that no one wants to talk about

    the maintainer side most casual docker image users aren't aware of I'd rephrase, but bitnami at least documents the issue

    https://github.com/bitnami/minideb#security

    https://docs.bitnami.com/kubernetes/open-cve-policy/

  • containers

    Bitnami container images

    redis 12:06:41.46 Submit issues and feature requests at https://github.com/bitnami/containers/issues

  • SaaSHub

    SaaSHub - Software Alternatives and Reviews. SaaSHub helps you find the best software and product alternatives

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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