Why Does The Business Care? with Michael Heap

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on dev.to

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  • Appwrite - The Open Source Firebase alternative introduces iOS support
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  • vimrc

    The ultimate Vim configuration (vimrc)

    Michael: I spent a long time getting my vimrc configured properly and all the right plugins and the language server protocols. And I just tried VS Code, and it just worked. I thought, how many hours could I have saved here? And then things like running projects in Remote Containers that's been a game-changer with a dev container that you can also use with Codespaces. Once I switched over, there was no going back.

  • alias-tips

    An oh-my-zsh plugin to help remembering those aliases you defined once

    The best plugin that I've seen recently is alias-tips, which if you run the command and you've got an alias configured for that, it pops up and says, "Hey, don't forget you can type this." So if I'm using Kubernetes and I write Kubectl, apply -f and then the manifest path, it'll say, "Hey, don't forget you can just run K-A-F, and then the path." So that's probably the best plugin that I've seen recently.

  • Appwrite

    Appwrite - The Open Source Firebase alternative introduces iOS support . Appwrite is an open source backend server that helps you build native iOS applications much faster with realtime APIs for authentication, databases, files storage, cloud functions and much more!

  • Vim

    The official Vim repository

    Michael: I did give up using Vim and moved to VS Code.

  • Travis CI.com

    Free continuous integration platform for GitHub projects.

    And it became quite a good conversation like, well, I wish that it would also update my GitHub Actions tree because of my Travis CI tree because I wish it did this, I wish it did that. I think the biggest users were the WG, the browser rendering engine people. They had some requirements they couldn't use until they were fixed. So we had a really good conversation there. But yeah, tech is never the hard part; it's always the people.

  • ohmyzsh

    🙃 A delightful community-driven (with 2,100+ contributors) framework for managing your zsh configuration. Includes 300+ optional plugins (rails, git, macOS, hub, docker, homebrew, node, php, python, etc), 140+ themes to spice up your morning, and an auto-update tool so that makes it easy to keep up with the latest updates from the community.

    Michael: Terminal-wise, it's iTerm2. There are lots of new ones that I like the idea of things like Fig. But I've just used iTerm for so long that that's my go-to. Use Zsh as your shell. Don't go for something like Oh My Zsh as a framework. I like to build the config file myself, so I know exactly what each piece is doing. I think my config file is less than 100 lines, and it does 90% of what the frameworks do.

  • kubernetes

    Production-Grade Container Scheduling and Management

    The best plugin that I've seen recently is alias-tips, which if you run the command and you've got an alias configured for that, it pops up and says, "Hey, don't forget you can type this." So if I'm using Kubernetes and I write Kubectl, apply -f and then the manifest path, it'll say, "Hey, don't forget you can just run K-A-F, and then the path." So that's probably the best plugin that I've seen recently.

  • starter-workflows

    Accelerating new GitHub Actions workflows

    I've got a CLI that shows me all of the GitHub Actions being used in an organization because I had to audit an org, and they didn't want to click through every single repo, a CLI that updates a secret value across all your repos. So instead of going through each repo one by one, again, just point to your user. And if that repo has a secret, whenever you specify, it will update the value. It's generally things that I'm too lazy to do over and over again by hand. That's the common theme.

  • Sonar

    Write Clean JavaScript Code. Always.. Sonar helps you commit clean code every time. With over 300 unique rules to find JavaScript bugs, code smells & vulnerabilities, Sonar finds the issues while you focus on the work.

  • Puts Debuggerer

    Ruby library for improved puts debugging, automatically displaying bonus useful information such as source line number and source code.

    Michael: So planning, time is key. For the longest time, I thought I don't have time for planning; let's just dive in on the next thing but actually sitting back and timeboxing. So I use a tool called Sunsama. It pulls in all my different data sources so Jira, GitHub, I used Todoist as my personal to-do list, stored Gmail emails, and then it lets you drag them on to whatever day you want to so that you can kind of plan out a week at a time if you want and put time estimates against them.

  • gateway-api

    Repository for the next iteration of composite service (e.g. Ingress) and load balancing APIs.

    Apart from that, we tie everything back to objectives and the key results that we're measuring. So yes, we want to redesign our template slide decks for our talks. But is that going to increase the number of people that we meet when we go to events? Probably not. So let's scrap that. Instead, let's spend that time investigating what the hot topics are in the industry, take a look at the new Kubernetes Gateway API and how we could apply that to our product so that we're compatible with everyone else because that's a better use of our time.

  • autocomplete

    IDE-style autocomplete for your existing terminal & shell

    Michael: Terminal-wise, it's iTerm2. There are lots of new ones that I like the idea of things like Fig. But I've just used iTerm for so long that that's my go-to. Use Zsh as your shell. Don't go for something like Oh My Zsh as a framework. I like to build the config file myself, so I know exactly what each piece is doing. I think my config file is less than 100 lines, and it does 90% of what the frameworks do.

  • Visual Studio Code

    Visual Studio Code

    Michael: I spent a long time getting my vimrc configured properly and all the right plugins and the language server protocols. And I just tried VS Code, and it just worked. I thought, how many hours could I have saved here? And then things like running projects in Remote Containers that's been a game-changer with a dev container that you can also use with Codespaces. Once I switched over, there was no going back.

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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