Why You Should Learn Lisp In 2022?

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on reddit.com/r/programming

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  • cl-cookbook

    The Common Lisp Cookbook

    Hey readers: for Common Lisp, you might find practical stuff here: https://lispcookbook.github.io/cl-cookbook/ and maybe more libraries than you think here: https://github.com/CodyReichert/awesome-cl

  • awesome-cl

    A curated list of awesome Common Lisp frameworks, libraries and other shiny stuff.

    Hey readers: for Common Lisp, you might find practical stuff here: https://lispcookbook.github.io/cl-cookbook/ and maybe more libraries than you think here: https://github.com/CodyReichert/awesome-cl

  • SonarLint

    Deliver Cleaner and Safer Code - Right in Your IDE of Choice!. SonarLint is a free and open source IDE extension that identifies and catches bugs and vulnerabilities as you code, directly in the IDE. Install from your favorite IDE marketplace today.

  • awesome-lisp-companies

    Awesome Lisp Companies

    Some example companies[1]: https://github.com/azzamsa/awesome-lisp-companies/ (interview of Kina Knowledge: https://lisp-journey.gitlab.io/blog/lisp-interview-kina/)

  • Programming-Language-Benchmarks

    Yet another implementation of computer language benchmarks game

  • Petalisp

    Elegant High Performance Computing

    A Common Lisp system has the compiler around at runtime, so if you can figure out how to profitably stage/specialise a computation, then you can roll your own cheap JIT of sorts. This can be useful for array munging and regular expressions at the least. You can do this in C, of course but you would need to use another compiler as a library (e.g. LLVM, TCC, libgccjit) or write your own (e.g. PCRE2's sljit).

  • one-more-re-nightmare

    A fast regular expression compiler in Common Lisp

    A Common Lisp system has the compiler around at runtime, so if you can figure out how to profitably stage/specialise a computation, then you can roll your own cheap JIT of sorts. This can be useful for array munging and regular expressions at the least. You can do this in C, of course but you would need to use another compiler as a library (e.g. LLVM, TCC, libgccjit) or write your own (e.g. PCRE2's sljit).

  • lserver

    https://notabug.org/quasus/lserver/

    The approach taken by lserver and ScriptL is to start a Lisp image in the background, and to run your scripts in it. We save the start-up time.

  • Scout APM

    Less time debugging, more time building. Scout APM allows you to find and fix performance issues with no hassle. Now with error monitoring and external services monitoring, Scout is a developer's best friend when it comes to application development.

  • lish

    Lisp Shell

    I guess we could leverage the lispy readline-based shell Lish to call our scripts from it. I did it for a simple one. Lish looked surprisingly feature complete: tab completion of shell and lisp symbols, ability to mix shell and lisp, an interactive debugger… it deserves to be explored.

  • lem

    Common Lisp editor/IDE with high expansibility

    Then, of course, a solution is to run the scripts from our editor… or from a friendly terminal-based interface? There's Lish, the Lem editor (for CL, Python and other languages), friendly REPLs… (cl-repl)

  • cl-repl

    A full-featured repl implementation designed to work with Roswell

    Then, of course, a solution is to run the scripts from our editor… or from a friendly terminal-based interface? There's Lish, the Lem editor (for CL, Python and other languages), friendly REPLs… (cl-repl)

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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