I tried to move entirely to Linux supporting programs before I migrate from Windows. Here's how it went

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on reddit.com/r/linux

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  • NoiseTorch

    Real-time microphone noise suppression on Linux.

    For noise suppression there's noisetorch. It works in a similar way to RTX voice

  • noise-suppression-for-voice

    Noise suppression plugin based on Xiph's RNNoise

    Alternative to RTXVoice or noisetorch for background noise suppression that appears to do more than just mute the mic: https://github.com/werman/noise-suppression-for-voice Here are some onlne demos of the noise removal library it uses. You can even use your microphone to record. https://jmvalin.ca/demo/rnnoise/

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  • obs_scripts

    scripts for obs

    NVidia Shadowplay > OBS: I'd long since fantasized about moving to OBS but like Linux itself, never really had anything encouraging me to put the effort in. It took some time to get my settings accurate to my Shadowplay ones, and I had to mess around with a third party plugin to get any kind of notification on whether my Replay Buffer recordings were even saving. But once it was all done, I'm much happier with it than I was with Shadowplay. Now I have my microphone, Teamspeak and game sounds all on separate channels, which makes recordings significantly easier to work with! But the fact that there's absolutely no form of notification system by default is pretty bad. Rainmeter > KDE Plasmoids: My Rainmeter setup wasn't a major thing I'd miss, I mainly kept it around for some visual flair and a few quality of life shortcuts. But when I found out that KDE Plasma had its own system for widgets, I was excited! Unfortunately their selection is very lacking both in functionality, and theme, compared to Rainmeter currently. Through sheer determination, a bunch of Googling, and eventually just cannibalising a paragraph of code from another user's widget, I did eventually manage to code together my own Launcher Plasmoid and re-create my old Rainmeter setup (Also using Plasma FancyClock). It was mostly enjoyable, but there was a sore lack of documentation on the whole process compared to Rainmeter: A very large part of what I learned came from repeatedly pestering the same user with questions, hence why I'm putting this one in the Harder Alternatives area. Paint.NET > Krita: I tried Gimp for a while, but felt like I was constantly grappling with the UI more than anything else so I moved to Krita. It's still a learning experience, and I feel like I take much longer to make the simple edits I need to often, but I'm slowly getting there. I would have preferred a more middle-ground editor for sure, Paint.NET is effectively just Paint with Layers, and usually that's all I need. GDrive > Insync/RClone: I quickly managed to replicate GDrive's automatic Backup and Sync with a basic RClone script. I only have a few files I need backed up and I can run the script manually when needed. I much prefer it this way, as now my internet connection isn't saturated every time I move a large file into one of my backed up folders. The shared folder functionality was the hard part. I tried many alternatives, GNOME/KDE's built in file browser support is slow and has to download everything you interact with every time, OverDrive was suspiciously broken by Google, Grive is abandoned and Grive2's developer is an ass. Repeatedly people recommended InSync, which I was against as it was paid. I was already paying for my Drive subscription, and didn't want to pay more on top of that just for a feature that had become a basic requirement for me. In the end, I got it for 50% off during a sale and haven't regreted my purchase since. I find it significantly better than the shit new client Google forced upon users. With selective sync, support for multiple accounts, and it supports syncing other locations without you needing to mess with Symlinks. However, the pricetag is still a hurdle, and I know how proprietary closed source software is frowned upon in this community. It's just a shame that there are absolutely no alternatives that come close. Plex: Strangely, while there's been a Plex Server Linux Version for several years, they don't have any player for it. They've said it's planned, but multiple months have passed and still no news on that front. I did manage to find a Community AppImage which does the job, but it is the older discontinued Plex Media Player software, not the current Plex program.

  • rclone

    "rsync for cloud storage" - Google Drive, S3, Dropbox, Backblaze B2, One Drive, Swift, Hubic, Wasabi, Google Cloud Storage, Yandex Files

    GDrive > Insync/RClone

  • TimeShift

    System restore tool for Linux. Creates filesystem snapshots using rsync+hardlinks, or BTRFS snapshots. Supports scheduled snapshots, multiple backup levels, and exclude filters. Snapshots can be restored while system is running or from Live CD/USB.

    TimeShift quelled a lot of the fear I initially had with messing with my system. The backups don't take a massive amount of space, and the speed at which they are restored means I can be back up and running mere minutes after screwing something up. Last time I used Windows System Restore, it corrupted my entire install! Samba has removed all need for me to use USB keys in my house anymore. It took me less than 10 minutes from first learning about it to set up, too. TMux: I probably used the Terminal more in these past two months than I had in my first decade of Windows, and Tmux just makes things so much faster to work with. Also supports CMus with a script that lets me hide and re-open the player whenever I want. TheFuck Is self explanatory. It's satisfying and amusing all at the same time.

  • obs-studio

    OBS Studio - Free and open source software for live streaming and screen recording

    NVidia Shadowplay > OBS

  • tmux

    tmux source code

    TimeShift quelled a lot of the fear I initially had with messing with my system. The backups don't take a massive amount of space, and the speed at which they are restored means I can be back up and running mere minutes after screwing something up. Last time I used Windows System Restore, it corrupted my entire install! Samba has removed all need for me to use USB keys in my house anymore. It took me less than 10 minutes from first learning about it to set up, too. TMux: I probably used the Terminal more in these past two months than I had in my first decade of Windows, and Tmux just makes things so much faster to work with. Also supports CMus with a script that lets me hide and re-open the player whenever I want. TheFuck Is self explanatory. It's satisfying and amusing all at the same time.

  • Scout APM

    Less time debugging, more time building. Scout APM allows you to find and fix performance issues with no hassle. Now with error monitoring and external services monitoring, Scout is a developer's best friend when it comes to application development.

  • thefuck

    Magnificent app which corrects your previous console command.

    TimeShift quelled a lot of the fear I initially had with messing with my system. The backups don't take a massive amount of space, and the speed at which they are restored means I can be back up and running mere minutes after screwing something up. Last time I used Windows System Restore, it corrupted my entire install! Samba has removed all need for me to use USB keys in my house anymore. It took me less than 10 minutes from first learning about it to set up, too. TMux: I probably used the Terminal more in these past two months than I had in my first decade of Windows, and Tmux just makes things so much faster to work with. Also supports CMus with a script that lets me hide and re-open the player whenever I want. TheFuck Is self explanatory. It's satisfying and amusing all at the same time.

  • flameshot

    Powerful yet simple to use screenshot software :desktop_computer: :camera_flash:

    For ShareX alternative, have you tried flameshot? It is pretty feature rich and you can script it to extend its functionalities.

  • sharenix

    A ShareX clone for Linux and FreeBSD.

    you can use sharex on linux, kinda. there is https://github.com/Francesco149/sharenix that uses flameshot as a frontend to make use of sharex backend. you can drag and drop your sharex json config file from windows and its supposed to work like that. i didnt try it in a while and there hasnt been an update in a while as well.

  • ReplaySorcery

    An open-source, instant-replay solution for Linux

  • peek

    Simple animated GIF screen recorder with an easy to use interface

    Peek is pretty good, too -- it's billed as "an animated GIF recorder", but it supports h.264 MP$, APNG, and WebM output as well. It's great for doing quick animations to demonstrate something.

  • Geany

    A fast and lightweight IDE

    Geany is an excellent FOSS choice as well.

  • drive

    Google Drive client for the commandline

    If you want a free google drive client for Linux this project should work ( I used it to sync my google drive files while in school) https://github.com/odeke-em/drive

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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