Migrating Selenium system tests to Cuprite

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  • Capybara

    Acceptance test framework for web applications

    In our project, we’ve been running system tests (then called rather "Feature tests") since around 2016. System tests use a real browser in the background and test all layers of a Rails application at once: from the database all the way up to the nuances of JavaScript loaded together with the web pages. Back then, we wrote our system tests using Capybara with Poltergeist, a driver that ran a headless Phantom JS browser. Since this browser stopped being actively developed, we migrated our test suite to the Selenium / Webdriver wrapper around Chrome browser around ~2018. Chrome was itself fine for tests automation but the Selenium API was quite limited and we had to rewrite several Poltergeist features using 3rd party gems and tools.

  • Poltergeist

    In our project, we’ve been running system tests (then called rather "Feature tests") since around 2016. System tests use a real browser in the background and test all layers of a Rails application at once: from the database all the way up to the nuances of JavaScript loaded together with the web pages. Back then, we wrote our system tests using Capybara with Poltergeist, a driver that ran a headless Phantom JS browser. Since this browser stopped being actively developed, we migrated our test suite to the Selenium / Webdriver wrapper around Chrome browser around ~2018. Chrome was itself fine for tests automation but the Selenium API was quite limited and we had to rewrite several Poltergeist features using 3rd party gems and tools.

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  • Selenium WebDriver

    A browser automation framework and ecosystem.

    In our project, we’ve been running system tests (then called rather "Feature tests") since around 2016. System tests use a real browser in the background and test all layers of a Rails application at once: from the database all the way up to the nuances of JavaScript loaded together with the web pages. Back then, we wrote our system tests using Capybara with Poltergeist, a driver that ran a headless Phantom JS browser. Since this browser stopped being actively developed, we migrated our test suite to the Selenium / Webdriver wrapper around Chrome browser around ~2018. Chrome was itself fine for tests automation but the Selenium API was quite limited and we had to rewrite several Poltergeist features using 3rd party gems and tools.

  • cuprite

    Headless Chrome/Chromium driver for Capybara

    It is called Cuprite

  • ferrum

    Headless Chrome Ruby API

    That is why we were happy to find out that a new ruby testing driver approach is being developed. It is called Cuprite, it runs the Ferrum library under the hood which, in turn, is an API that directly instruments the Chrome browser using the Chrome DevTools Protocol (CDP). About a week ago, we finally made a serious attempt to make our system test suite run on Cuprite, with especially two questions in our minds:

  • puffing-billy

    A rewriting web proxy for testing interactions between your browser and external sites. Works with ruby + rspec.

    For a lot of these features, we previously had to adopt various 3rd party gems, such as the Puffing Billy proxy (for blocking domains), the webdrivers gem (for auto-updating the Chrome drivers), etc. and although they certainly did a good job for us, now we were able to finally rip them off the project completely:

  • webdrivers

    Keep your Selenium WebDrivers updated automatically

    For a lot of these features, we previously had to adopt various 3rd party gems, such as the Puffing Billy proxy (for blocking domains), the webdrivers gem (for auto-updating the Chrome drivers), etc. and although they certainly did a good job for us, now we were able to finally rip them off the project completely:

  • SonarLint

    Deliver Cleaner and Safer Code - Right in Your IDE of Choice!. SonarLint is a free and open source IDE extension that identifies and catches bugs and vulnerabilities as you code, directly in the IDE. Install from your favorite IDE marketplace today.

  • dropzone

    Dropzone is an easy to use drag'n'drop library. It supports image previews and shows nice progress bars.

    We use Dropzone JS to support uploading files. Under Cuprite, uploading stopped working and an ERR_ACCESS_DENIED error was shown in the JavaScript console each time a test attempted to upload a file.

  • stimulus-use

    A collection of composable behaviors for your Stimulus Controllers

    For example, we have a few ”live search“ fields, backed by back-end Fetch requests, on some pages. The live search function was usually triggered by the keyup event and Cuprite was such a fast typewriter that it frequently sent multiple requests almost at once. If some of the responses got a bit late or out of sync, the front-end JavaScript code began hitting issues. We solved this by adopting a technique called debouncing and, frankly, we should have done this since the beginning. By the way, we used the useDebounce module from the marvelous Stimulus-use library to achieve this.

  • phantomjs

    Scriptable Headless Browser

    In our project, we’ve been running system tests (then called rather "Feature tests") since around 2016. System tests use a real browser in the background and test all layers of a Rails application at once: from the database all the way up to the nuances of JavaScript loaded together with the web pages. Back then, we wrote our system tests using Capybara with Poltergeist, a driver that ran a headless Phantom JS browser. Since this browser stopped being actively developed, we migrated our test suite to the Selenium / Webdriver wrapper around Chrome browser around ~2018. Chrome was itself fine for tests automation but the Selenium API was quite limited and we had to rewrite several Poltergeist features using 3rd party gems and tools.

NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

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