Ask HN: Why did Nim not catch-on like wild fire as Rust did?

This page summarizes the projects mentioned and recommended in the original post on news.ycombinator.com

Our great sponsors
  • InfluxDB - Power Real-Time Data Analytics at Scale
  • WorkOS - The modern identity platform for B2B SaaS
  • SaaSHub - Software Alternatives and Reviews
  • NimForUE

    Nim plugin for UE5 with native performance, hot reloading and full interop that sits between C++ and Blueprints. This allows you to do common UE workflows like for example to extend any UE class in Nim and extending it again in Blueprint if you wish so without restarting the editor. The final aim is to be able to do in Nim what you can do in C++

  • I started using Nim because i wanted to port some of machine learning models written in python with the idea of making them more portable. It was a lot of work as community is relatively small and a new user would end up writing a lot of code.

    But Nim has a pretty solid standard library with clearly written code and an awesome community to help with problems. I generally read a lot of standard library code to expand my knowledge of language and discover common patterns which repeat themselves in a lot of real world problems.

    C inter-op is really first class, and as far as i know it has one of best C++ inter-op as well, you can take a look at: https://github.com/jmgomez/NimForUE for a real world example.

    I use Nim for my work in both professional and personal capacity and also have written about some of it at https://ramanlabs.in/static/blog/index.html

  • cligen

    Nim library to infer/generate command-line-interfaces / option / argument parsing; Docs at

  • I don't know about all your other questions, but the https://github.com/c-blake/cligen CLI framework seems much lower effort / ceremony than even Rust's `argh` and is just about as old as `clap` (both started 8 years ago in 2015).

    There are over 50 CLI utilities at https://github.com/c-blake/bu, many of which do something novel rather than just "re-doing ls/find/cat with a twist". While they are really more an "ls/ps construction toolkits" with some default configs to get people going, I think https://github.com/c-blake/lc and https://github.com/c-blake/procs are nicer than Rust alternatives. I mention these since you seem interested in such tools.

  • InfluxDB

    Power Real-Time Data Analytics at Scale. Get real-time insights from all types of time series data with InfluxDB. Ingest, query, and analyze billions of data points in real-time with unbounded cardinality.

    InfluxDB logo
  • v

    Simple, fast, safe, compiled language for developing maintainable software. Compiles itself in <1s with zero library dependencies. Supports automatic C => V translation. https://vlang.io

  • Besides the attempted slap on V coming from "out of left field", in regards to what the above commenter was talking about, V doesn't leak memory like that. V, since becoming beta, uses an optional GC and does flexible memory management[1]. Giving users choices, somewhat like D and Nim do.

    It provides 4 choices: default optional GC, autofree (either alone or with GC), arena allocation (-prealloc), or manual memory management (-gc none). This flexibility has already been proven, like with their Vinix OS project[2].

    [1]: https://github.com/vlang/v/blob/master/doc/docs.md#memory-ma... (4 ways to manage memory in V)

  • vos

    Vinix is an effort to write a modern, fast, and useful operating system in the V programming language

  • bu

    B)asic|But-For U)tility Code/Programs (in Nim & Often Unix/POSIX/Linux Context)

  • I don't know about all your other questions, but the https://github.com/c-blake/cligen CLI framework seems much lower effort / ceremony than even Rust's `argh` and is just about as old as `clap` (both started 8 years ago in 2015).

    There are over 50 CLI utilities at https://github.com/c-blake/bu, many of which do something novel rather than just "re-doing ls/find/cat with a twist". While they are really more an "ls/ps construction toolkits" with some default configs to get people going, I think https://github.com/c-blake/lc and https://github.com/c-blake/procs are nicer than Rust alternatives. I mention these since you seem interested in such tools.

  • lc

    A post-modern, "multi-dimensional", configurable, abbreviating, extensible ls/file lister in Nim

  • I don't know about all your other questions, but the https://github.com/c-blake/cligen CLI framework seems much lower effort / ceremony than even Rust's `argh` and is just about as old as `clap` (both started 8 years ago in 2015).

    There are over 50 CLI utilities at https://github.com/c-blake/bu, many of which do something novel rather than just "re-doing ls/find/cat with a twist". While they are really more an "ls/ps construction toolkits" with some default configs to get people going, I think https://github.com/c-blake/lc and https://github.com/c-blake/procs are nicer than Rust alternatives. I mention these since you seem interested in such tools.

  • procs

    Unix process&system query&format lib&multi-command CLI in Nim (by c-blake)

  • I don't know about all your other questions, but the https://github.com/c-blake/cligen CLI framework seems much lower effort / ceremony than even Rust's `argh` and is just about as old as `clap` (both started 8 years ago in 2015).

    There are over 50 CLI utilities at https://github.com/c-blake/bu, many of which do something novel rather than just "re-doing ls/find/cat with a twist". While they are really more an "ls/ps construction toolkits" with some default configs to get people going, I think https://github.com/c-blake/lc and https://github.com/c-blake/procs are nicer than Rust alternatives. I mention these since you seem interested in such tools.

  • WorkOS

    The modern identity platform for B2B SaaS. The APIs are flexible and easy-to-use, supporting authentication, user identity, and complex enterprise features like SSO and SCIM provisioning.

    WorkOS logo
  • wasmtime

    A fast and secure runtime for WebAssembly

  • WebAssembly is not just for the web. Please take a look at wasmtime[1], wasmer[2]. It's the future of computing.

    You might want to read this iconic tweet[3]

    [1]: https://wasmtime.dev

  • wasmer

    🚀 The leading Wasm Runtime supporting WASIX, WASI and Emscripten

  • ripgrep

    ripgrep recursively searches directories for a regex pattern while respecting your gitignore

  • A fun fact, ripgrep used docopt for arg parsing in its original release: https://github.com/BurntSushi/ripgrep/blob/b1c52b52d6eed5b24...

    I switched to Clap pretty quickly after the initial release though. Like a couple months: https://github.com/BurntSushi/ripgrep/pull/233

    I do currently have loose plans to move away from Clap to lexopt. But I don't know when or if that happens.

  • nimkernel

    A small kernel written in Nim

  • Niceness is subjective, but Nim is just as valid an addition to that group. Nim compiles to C and has had an --os=standalone mode for like 10 years from its git history, and as mentioned else-thread (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=36506087) can be used for Linux kernel modules. Multiple people have written "stub OSes" in it (https://github.com/dom96/nimkernel & further along https://github.com/khaledh/axiom).

    While it can use clang as a backend, Nim does not rely upon LLVM support like Zig or Rust (pre-gcc-rust working). Use on embedded devices is fairly popular: https://forum.nim-lang.org/search?q=embedded (or web search).

    Latency-wise, for a time, video game programming was a perceived "adoption niche" or maybe "hook" for Nim and games often have stringent frame rendering deadlines. If you are interested in video games, you might appreciate https://github.com/shish/rosettaboy which covers all but Ada in your list with Nim being fastest (on one CPU/version/compiler/etc). Note, however, that cross-PL comparisons are often done by those with much "porting energy" but limited familiarity with any but a few of the PLs. A better way to view it is that "Nim responds well to optimization effort" (like C/Ada/C++/Rust/Zig).

  • axiom

    A 64-bit kernel implemented in Nim (by khaledh)

  • Niceness is subjective, but Nim is just as valid an addition to that group. Nim compiles to C and has had an --os=standalone mode for like 10 years from its git history, and as mentioned else-thread (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=36506087) can be used for Linux kernel modules. Multiple people have written "stub OSes" in it (https://github.com/dom96/nimkernel & further along https://github.com/khaledh/axiom).

    While it can use clang as a backend, Nim does not rely upon LLVM support like Zig or Rust (pre-gcc-rust working). Use on embedded devices is fairly popular: https://forum.nim-lang.org/search?q=embedded (or web search).

    Latency-wise, for a time, video game programming was a perceived "adoption niche" or maybe "hook" for Nim and games often have stringent frame rendering deadlines. If you are interested in video games, you might appreciate https://github.com/shish/rosettaboy which covers all but Ada in your list with Nim being fastest (on one CPU/version/compiler/etc). Note, however, that cross-PL comparisons are often done by those with much "porting energy" but limited familiarity with any but a few of the PLs. A better way to view it is that "Nim responds well to optimization effort" (like C/Ada/C++/Rust/Zig).

  • rosettaboy

    A gameboy emulator in several different languages

  • Niceness is subjective, but Nim is just as valid an addition to that group. Nim compiles to C and has had an --os=standalone mode for like 10 years from its git history, and as mentioned else-thread (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=36506087) can be used for Linux kernel modules. Multiple people have written "stub OSes" in it (https://github.com/dom96/nimkernel & further along https://github.com/khaledh/axiom).

    While it can use clang as a backend, Nim does not rely upon LLVM support like Zig or Rust (pre-gcc-rust working). Use on embedded devices is fairly popular: https://forum.nim-lang.org/search?q=embedded (or web search).

    Latency-wise, for a time, video game programming was a perceived "adoption niche" or maybe "hook" for Nim and games often have stringent frame rendering deadlines. If you are interested in video games, you might appreciate https://github.com/shish/rosettaboy which covers all but Ada in your list with Nim being fastest (on one CPU/version/compiler/etc). Note, however, that cross-PL comparisons are often done by those with much "porting energy" but limited familiarity with any but a few of the PLs. A better way to view it is that "Nim responds well to optimization effort" (like C/Ada/C++/Rust/Zig).

  • iomrascalai

    Iomrascálaí is an AI for the game of Go/Weiqi/Baduk written in Rust

  • You really don't, I worked on a Rust project:

    https://github.com/ujh/iomrascalai

    it doesn't need unsafe code despite being performance-optimized

  • SaaSHub

    SaaSHub - Software Alternatives and Reviews. SaaSHub helps you find the best software and product alternatives

    SaaSHub logo
NOTE: The number of mentions on this list indicates mentions on common posts plus user suggested alternatives. Hence, a higher number means a more popular project.

Suggest a related project

Related posts